Wiktenauer logo.png

Difference between revisions of "Andre Paurñfeyndt"

From Wiktenauer
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Line 3,332: Line 3,332:
 
Leg dich mit dem rechten fuß für / dz dein stang hinder dir lig zum streich zuck und wirff im dein stangen uß der leng in sein rechten seiten / so muß er sich versetzen zu seinem schaden / und dir den schwang geben zu der lincken seiten.
 
Leg dich mit dem rechten fuß für / dz dein stang hinder dir lig zum streich zuck und wirff im dein stangen uß der leng in sein rechten seiten / so muß er sich versetzen zu seinem schaden / und dir den schwang geben zu der lincken seiten.
 
| '''Pieche'''
 
| '''Pieche'''
Mectez vostre droict pied devant que vostre estocq gise derier vous au train tirez et luyruez lestocq au loing, ou a tout le longure en son droict coste il luy fauldra remectre la deffence a son dommaige, & donner le tect vers le senestre coste.
+
Mectez vostre droict pied devant que vostre estocq gise derier vous au train tirez et luyruez lestocq au loing, ou a tout la longure en son droict coste il luy fauldra remectre la deffence a son dommaige, & donner le tect vers le senestre coste.
 
|  
 
|  
 
| '''[59v] / stuckh /'''
 
| '''[59v] / stuckh /'''
Line 3,391: Line 3,391:
 
Wann sich einer verhawen hat / und sich seiner versatzung behilft so stoß im von oben nider inwendig zu seim gesicht / So muß er dem stoßwern / so sterck du gegen im dz dein ort zwüschen seiner beider hendt und deß leib eingewunden wird / und heb übersich / so nimstu im sein stangen.
 
Wann sich einer verhawen hat / und sich seiner versatzung behilft so stoß im von oben nider inwendig zu seim gesicht / So muß er dem stoßwern / so sterck du gegen im dz dein ort zwüschen seiner beider hendt und deß leib eingewunden wird / und heb übersich / so nimstu im sein stangen.
 
| '''Rompure'''
 
| '''Rompure'''
Quand aulcun sa contret etu le coup, et se ayde a tout sa defense, luy boutez par defence apres son visaige, il luy fauldra le coup tourner iuz ou empescher, & le coug tournant fortifie vous contre luy que vostre debout le gaingne entre les deux mains & son corps & levez a mont, ainsi vous luy prenez son estocq.
+
Quand aulcun sa contretetu le coup, et se ayde a tout sa defense, luy boutez par deseur apres son visaige, il luy fauldra le coup tourner iuz ou empescher, & le coug tournant fortifie vous contre luy que vostre debout le gaingne entre ses deux mains & son corps & levez a mont, ainsi vous luy prenez son estocq.
 
|  
 
|  
 
| '''Bruch /'''
 
| '''Bruch /'''

Revision as of 10:28, 25 January 2016

Andre Paurñfeyndt
Born 15th century
Died 16th century
Occupation
Nationality German
Patron Matthäus Lang von Wellenburg
Movement Liechtenauer Tradition
Influences Johannes Liechtenauer
Influenced
Genres
Language Early New High German
Notable work(s) Ergrundung Ritterlicher Kunst der Fechterey (1516)
Manuscript(s)
Concordance by Michael Chidester and Jeremiah Smith
Translations Deutsch-Übersetzung

Andre Paurñfeyndt (Paurñfeindt, Paurenfeindt) was a 16th century German Freifechter. He seems to have been a resident of Vienna, although he mentions in his introduction that he served as a bodyguard to Cardinal Matthäus Lang von Wellenburg (1468 - 1540).[1] In 1516, he wrote and published a fencing manual entitled Ergrundung Ritterlicher Kunst der Fechterey ("Founding of the Chivalric Art of Swordplay"), which Sydney Anglo notes may have been the first illustrated work of its kind.[2] Little else is known about the life of this master, but he describes himself as a Freifechter and the contents of his book make it clear that he was associated with the tradition of Johannes Liechtenauer. His treatise diverges significantly from the standard teachings of the Liechtenauer tradition, but this may be due to his stated purpose of writing for beginning fencers.

Treatise

Please note that only the first edition of this text (1516) has a complete set of illustrations, and we currently do not have scans of that edition that we are authorized to distribute. This article is illustrated using the remaining three illustrated texts, but following the order laid out in the original. The only exception to this is the image on page H2v of the 1516, which is replaced by the three images used in Egenolff's version. Furthermore, while the Twelve Rules for the Beginning Fencer are unillustrated in Paurñfeyndt's work, this presentation includes the illustrations for six of the twelve found in the MS B.200 (1524).

Additional Resources

References

  1. Ott, Michael. "Matthew Lang." The Catholic Encyclopedia, Vol. 8. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1910.
  2. Anglo, Sydney. The Martial Arts of Renaissance Europe. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2000. p 46. ISBN 978-0-300-08352-1