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Difference between revisions of "Andre Paurñfeyndt"

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|-  
 
|-  
| '''Break'''
+
| '''COUNTER'''
When anyone does that to you as above, throw your end over his staff, and then strike the other end to him on his head.
+
When one does this to you, then shoot your point in over his staff, and strike him with the other point on his head.
 
| '''PRVCH'''
 
| '''PRVCH'''
 
Wan dir daſʒ ainer thut ſo ſcheus ym dein ort vber ſein ſtangñ vñ ſchlach yn mit dem an derñ ort auff ſein kopff
 
Wan dir daſʒ ainer thut ſo ſcheus ym dein ort vber ſein ſtangñ vñ ſchlach yn mit dem an derñ ort auff ſein kopff
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|-  
 
|-  
| '''Play'''
+
| '''TECHNIQUE'''
If anyone fixedly binds over to the face with half-staff, take his over with your low end sent from the hand, step and strike; thus you return to the working without harm
+
One binds on you above with half-staff, then take his upper point away from his hand with your lower point, step, thrust, and strike, so you may come to further work without harm.
 
| '''STVCK'''
 
| '''STVCK'''
 
Pindt dir ainer obñ an mit halber ſtangen / ſo nim ſein obers ort mit deinem vnterñ ort weg von der hant / trit ſtoſʒ vñ ſchlach / ſo magſtu weitter ʒu arbait kummen an ſchadñ
 
Pindt dir ainer obñ an mit halber ſtangen / ſo nim ſein obers ort mit deinem vnterñ ort weg von der hant / trit ſtoſʒ vñ ſchlach / ſo magſtu weitter ʒu arbait kummen an ſchadñ
Line 3,143: Line 3,143:
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| '''Break'''
+
| '''COUNTER'''
When anyone takes your end, allow the end to fall over in his face and drop to the starting defense, if he repels, turn off from the face when he gives it and set to defend.
+
When one takes your point away, then let the lower point shoot in his face, and fall in the set displacement. However, if he thrusts, turn it off from your face, so he again lies in force.
 
| '''PRVCH'''
 
| '''PRVCH'''
 
Wan dir ainer dein ort weg nimbt / fo laſʒ ym den vntterñ ort in ſein gſicht ſchieſſñ vnd fal in die gſacʒt verſacʒung / ſtoſt er aber wendt ab vom gſicht ſo er ſich wider yn gwaldt legt
 
Wan dir ainer dein ort weg nimbt / fo laſʒ ym den vntterñ ort in ſein gſicht ſchieſſñ vnd fal in die gſacʒt verſacʒung / ſtoſt er aber wendt ab vom gſicht ſo er ſich wider yn gwaldt legt
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|-  
 
|-  
 
| rowspan="5" | [[File:Egenolff 33.jpg|300px|center]]
 
| rowspan="5" | [[File:Egenolff 33.jpg|300px|center]]
| '''Play'''
+
| '''[13] TECHNIQUE'''
Place your defense, the staff before you with the long end to the ground and the other before your face. If anyone thrusts at you turn from him his staff over the hand with your staff, by which you uncover him, so step to him and thrust boldly at his face.
+
Lay yourself in the displacement, your staff before you on the earth, the other point before your face. If one thrusts at you, then wind his staff over the hand with your staff, therewith you open him.  Step freely after with the thrust against his face.
 
| '''[I3] STVCK.'''
 
| '''[I3] STVCK.'''
 
Leger dich in die verſacʒung / dein ſtangñ for dir auff der erdt / den anderñ ort form͂ gſicht / ſtoſt dir ainer ʒu windt ym ſein ſtangen vber die hãdt mit deiner ſtangñ dar mit du yn pleſt trit dem ſtoſʒ frelich nach gegñ ſeinem gſicht
 
Leger dich in die verſacʒung / dein ſtangñ for dir auff der erdt / den anderñ ort form͂ gſicht / ſtoſt dir ainer ʒu windt ym ſein ſtangen vber die hãdt mit deiner ſtangñ dar mit du yn pleſt trit dem ſtoſʒ frelich nach gegñ ſeinem gſicht

Revision as of 02:16, 31 October 2016

Andre Paurñfeyndt
Born 15th century
Died 16th century
Occupation
Nationality German
Patron Matthäus Lang von Wellenburg
Movement Liechtenauer Tradition
Influences Johannes Liechtenauer
Influenced
Genres
Language Early New High German
Notable work(s) Ergrundung Ritterlicher Kunst der Fechterey (1516)
Manuscript(s)
Concordance by Michael Chidester and Jeremiah Smith
Translations Deutsch-Übersetzung

Andre Paurñfeyndt (Paurñfeindt, Paurenfeindt) was a 16th century German Freifechter. He seems to have been a resident of Vienna, although he mentions in his introduction that he served as a bodyguard to Cardinal Matthäus Lang von Wellenburg (1468 - 1540).[1] In 1516, he wrote and published a fencing manual entitled Ergrundung Ritterlicher Kunst der Fechterey ("Founding of the Chivalric Art of Swordplay"), which Sydney Anglo notes may have been the first illustrated work of its kind.[2] Little else is known about the life of this master, but he describes himself as a Freifechter and the contents of his book make it clear that he was associated with the tradition of Johannes Liechtenauer. His treatise diverges significantly from the standard teachings of the Liechtenauer tradition, but this may be due to his stated purpose of writing for beginning fencers.

Treatise

Please note that only the first edition of this text (1516) has a complete set of illustrations, and we currently do not have scans of that edition that we are authorized to distribute. This article is illustrated using the remaining three illustrated texts, but following the order laid out in the original. The only exception to this is the image on page H2v of the 1516, which is replaced by the three images used in Egenolff's version. Furthermore, while the Twelve Rules for the Beginning Fencer are unillustrated in Paurñfeyndt's work, this presentation includes the illustrations for six of the twelve found in the MS B.200 (1524).

Additional Resources

References

  1. Ott, Michael. "Matthew Lang." The Catholic Encyclopedia, Vol. 8. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1910.
  2. Anglo, Sydney. The Martial Arts of Renaissance Europe. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2000. p 46. ISBN 978-0-300-08352-1