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'''Balthasaro Cramonio Pomerano''' was a [[century::16th century]] [[nationality::German]] [[fencing master]]. What little is known about his life is recorded in the 1579 treatise of his associate (or possibly student) [[Heinrich von Gunterrodt]]. From this source, we know that he was a student of [[Johannes Herbart von Würzburg]] and was also a medical student at the time. Gunterrodt also states that he had been maimed in a fight with "criminals" and lost the use of his left arm (and then learned to fence with his right, implying that he had been left-handed).<ref>[[Bert Gevaert]]. ''The True Principles of Combat: An underestimated martial arts treatise from the 16th century''. [[Freelance Academy Press]], 2020. pp 67-69.</ref>
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'''Balthasaro Cramonio Pomerano''' was a [[century::16th century]] [[nationality::Polish]] [[fencing master]]. What little is known about his life is recorded in the 1579 treatise of his associate (or possibly student) [[Heinrich von Gunterrodt]]. From this source, we know that he was a student of [[Johannes Herbart von Würzburg]] and was also a medical student at the time. Gunterrodt also states that he had been maimed in a fight with "criminals" and lost the use of his left arm (and then learned to fence with his right, implying that he had been left-handed).<ref>[[Bert Gevaert]]. ''The True Principles of Combat: An underestimated martial arts treatise from the 16th century''. [[Freelance Academy Press]], 2020. pp 67-69.</ref>
  
He is likely the author of a broadside titled ''Austeilunge oder Ordnunge des Zirckelfechtens'' ("Exposition or Ordering of the Circle-fencing"); the only known copy is currently glued into a copy of the [[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 treatise of Joachim Meyer]].<ref>Cataloged under the signature Ⅱ 10.019 in the Vědecká knihovna v Olomouci in Olomouc, Czech Republic. https://aleph.vkol.cz:443/F?func=direct&doc_number=000668380&local_base=SVK01&format=999</ref> It is written in German with scattered Latin words and phrases and signed B. C. P.
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He is likely the author of a broadside titled ''Austeilunge oder Ordnunge des Zirckelfechtens'' ("Exposition or Ordering of the Circle-fencing"); the only known copy is currently glued into a copy of the [[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 treatise of Joachim Meyer]].<ref>Cataloged under the signature Ⅱ 10.019 in the Vědecká knihovna v Olomouci in Olomouc, Czech Republic. https://aleph.vkol.cz:443/F?func=direct&doc_number=000668380&local_base=SVK01&format=999</ref> It is written in German with scattered Latin words and phrases and signed B. C. P. Curiously, it also describes a diagram (not present in the book) which matches one glued onto [[:File:MS Dresd.C.15 04v.png|folio 4v]] of Gunterrodt's 1579 manuscript ([[Sciomachia_et_hoplomachia_(MS_Dresd.C.15)|MS Dresd.C.15]]), and the short Latin and German poems at the bottom are likewise included in Gunterrodt's work.
 
 
Curiously, it also describes a diagram (not present in the book) which matches one glued onto [[:File:MS Dresd.C.15 04v.png|folio 4v]] of Gunterrodt's 1579 manuscript ([[Sciomachia_et_hoplomachia_(MS_Dresd.C.15)|MS Dresd.C.15]]), and the short Latin and German poems at the bottom are likewise included in Gunterrodt's work.
 
  
 
== Treatise ==
 
== Treatise ==
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<p>How this must be practiced and used according to this ordering with all weapons, as required by the workings and division of a man, as well as the division of the blade of every weapon, presented in a thorough explanation. However, those who want to learn and fence with the rapier alone must note the following rules and what they contain very thoroughly.</p>
 
<p>How this must be practiced and used according to this ordering with all weapons, as required by the workings and division of a man, as well as the division of the blade of every weapon, presented in a thorough explanation. However, those who want to learn and fence with the rapier alone must note the following rules and what they contain very thoroughly.</p>
| {{section|Page:Austeilunge oder Ordnunge des Zirckelfechtens 1.png|1|lbl=Page}}
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| {{section|Page:Austeilunge oder Ordnunge des Zirckelfechtens 1.png|1|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| class="noline" | [[File:AusTeilung des Circkels.png|400px|center]]{{-}}
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| rowspan="6" | [[File:AusTeilung des Circkels.png|400px|center]]{{-}}
 
| <p>'''First Rule.''' Preparation in the thrusts.</p>
 
| <p>'''First Rule.''' Preparation in the thrusts.</p>
  
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| <p>'''Second Rule.''' Secondly, you must note the displacements or barring-thrusts. These barrings or displacements are also threefold, or of three kinds.</p>
 
| <p>'''Second Rule.''' Secondly, you must note the displacements or barring-thrusts. These barrings or displacements are also threefold, or of three kinds.</p>
  

Latest revision as of 03:10, 22 May 2022

Balthasaro Cramonio Pomerano
Influences Johannes Herbart von Würzburg
Influenced Heinrich von Gunterrodt
Genres Fencing manual
Language Early New High German
Notable work(s) Austeilunge oder Ordnunge des Zirckelfechtens

Balthasaro Cramonio Pomerano was a 16th century Polish fencing master. What little is known about his life is recorded in the 1579 treatise of his associate (or possibly student) Heinrich von Gunterrodt. From this source, we know that he was a student of Johannes Herbart von Würzburg and was also a medical student at the time. Gunterrodt also states that he had been maimed in a fight with "criminals" and lost the use of his left arm (and then learned to fence with his right, implying that he had been left-handed).[1]

He is likely the author of a broadside titled Austeilunge oder Ordnunge des Zirckelfechtens ("Exposition or Ordering of the Circle-fencing"); the only known copy is currently glued into a copy of the 1570 treatise of Joachim Meyer.[2] It is written in German with scattered Latin words and phrases and signed B. C. P. Curiously, it also describes a diagram (not present in the book) which matches one glued onto folio 4v of Gunterrodt's 1579 manuscript (MS Dresd.C.15), and the short Latin and German poems at the bottom are likewise included in Gunterrodt's work.

Treatise

Additional Resources

References

  1. Bert Gevaert. The True Principles of Combat: An underestimated martial arts treatise from the 16th century. Freelance Academy Press, 2020. pp 67-69.
  2. Cataloged under the signature Ⅱ 10.019 in the Vědecká knihovna v Olomouci in Olomouc, Czech Republic. https://aleph.vkol.cz:443/F?func=direct&doc_number=000668380&local_base=SVK01&format=999