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Difference between revisions of "Johannes Lecküchner"

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{{under construction}}
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{{infobox writer
{{Infobox writer
 
 
| name                = [[name::Johannes Lecküchner]]
 
| name                = [[name::Johannes Lecküchner]]
 
| image                = File:Johannes Lecküchner.png
 
| image                = File:Johannes Lecküchner.png
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The typical Wiktenauer style is to break up the Recital into verses in a standard fashion according to their rhyme scheme. In the case of Lecküchner, however, the Recital is already broken into discrete lines in most extant copies, but the precise separation varies from copy to copy. The format of the various copies has therefore been preserved in this table in order to allow comparison (even though that means leaving the Vienna version completely un-separated). In the translation, the verses that are common to multiple copies are rendered in <span class="red" style="font-weight:bold;">red text</span>, while the verses that are unique to [[Kunst des Messerfechtens (Cgm 582)|Munich version Ⅰ]] appear in '''black text'''.
 
The typical Wiktenauer style is to break up the Recital into verses in a standard fashion according to their rhyme scheme. In the case of Lecküchner, however, the Recital is already broken into discrete lines in most extant copies, but the precise separation varies from copy to copy. The format of the various copies has therefore been preserved in this table in order to allow comparison (even though that means leaving the Vienna version completely un-separated). In the translation, the verses that are common to multiple copies are rendered in <span class="red" style="font-weight:bold;">red text</span>, while the verses that are unique to [[Kunst des Messerfechtens (Cgm 582)|Munich version Ⅰ]] appear in '''black text'''.
 +
 +
:''To view a version of this table without illustrations, see [[Johannes Lecküchner/No illustrations]].''
  
 
<div class="collapsibletemplate collapsed">
 
<div class="collapsibletemplate collapsed">
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{| class="master sortable"
 
{| class="master sortable"
 
|-  
 
|-  
! <p>Illustrations<br/>from the Heidelberg and Munich</p>
+
! <p>Illustrations<br/>from the Munich</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|start|Partial Translation (from the Heidelberg)}}<br/>by [[Grzegorz&nbsp;Żabiński]], [[Russell&nbsp;A.&nbsp;Mitchell]], [[Falko&nbsp;Fritz]]</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|start|Partial Translation (from the Heidelberg)}}<br/>by [[Grzegorz&nbsp;Żabiński]], [[Russell&nbsp;A.&nbsp;Mitchell]], [[Falko&nbsp;Fritz]]</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|C|Draft Translation (from the Munich)}}<br/>by [[Grzegorz&nbsp;Żabiński]], [[Russell&nbsp;A.&nbsp;Mitchell]], [[Falko&nbsp;Fritz]]</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|C|Draft Translation (from the Munich)}}<br/>by [[Grzegorz&nbsp;Żabiński]], [[Russell&nbsp;A.&nbsp;Mitchell]], [[Falko&nbsp;Fritz]]</p>
! <p>[[Codex Speyer (MS M.I.29)|Salzburg Transcription]] (1491){{edit index|Codex Speyer (MS M.I.29)}}<br/>by [[Dierk Hagedorn]]</p>
+
! <p>[[Codex Speyer (MS M.I.29)|Salzburg Transcription]] (1491)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[https://wiktenauer.com/wiki/Index:Codex_Speyer_(MS_M.I.29) edit]&#93;</span><br/>by [[Dierk Hagedorn]]</p>
! <p>[[Kunst des Messerfechtens (Cod.Pal.Germ.430)|Heidelberg Transcription]] (1478){{edit index|Kunst des Messerfechtens (Cod.Pal.Germ.430)}}<br/>by [[Grzegorz&nbsp;Żabiński]], [[Russell&nbsp;A.&nbsp;Mitchell]], [[Falko&nbsp;Fritz]]</p>
+
! <p>[[Kunst des Messerfechtens (Cod.Pal.Germ.430)|Heidelberg Transcription]] (1478)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[https://wiktenauer.com/wiki/Index:Kunst_des_Messerfechtens_(Cod.Pal.Germ.430) edit]&#93;</span><br/>by [[Grzegorz&nbsp;Żabiński]], [[Russell&nbsp;A.&nbsp;Mitchell]], [[Falko&nbsp;Fritz]]</p>
! <p>[[Kunst des Messerfechtens (Cgm 582)|Munich Ⅰ Transcription]] (1482)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[{{fullurl:Index:Kunst des Messerfechtens (Cgm 582)}} edit]&#93;</span><br/>by [[Carsten Lorbeer|Carsten]]&nbsp;and&nbsp;[[Julia&nbsp;Lorbeer]], [[Johann&nbsp;Heim]], [[Robert&nbsp;Brunner]], [[Alex&nbsp;Kiermayer]]</p>
+
! <p>[[Kunst des Messerfechtens (Cgm 582)|Munich Ⅰ Transcription]] (1482)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[https://wiktenauer.com/wiki/Index:Kunst_des_Messerfechtens_(Cgm_582) edit]&#93;</span><br/>by [[Carsten&nbsp;Lorbeer]], [[Julia&nbsp;Lorbeer]], [[Johann&nbsp;Heim]], [[Robert&nbsp;Brunner]], [[Alex&nbsp;Kiermayer]]</p>
! <p>[[Oplodidaskalia sive Armorvm Tractandorvm Meditatio Alberti Dvreri (MS 26-232)|Vienna Transcription]] (1512)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[{{fullurl:Index:Oplodidaskalia sive Armorvm Tractandorvm Meditatio Alberti Dvreri (MS 26-232)}} edit]&#93;</span><br/>by [[Dierk Hagedorn]]</p>
+
! <p>[[Oplodidaskalia sive Armorvm Tractandorvm Meditatio Alberti Dvreri (MS 26-232)|Vienna Transcription]] (1512)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[https://wiktenauer.com/wiki/Index:Oplodidaskalia_sive_Armorvm_Tractandorvm_Meditatio_Alberti_Dvreri_(MS_26-232) edit]&#93;</span><br/>by [[Dierk Hagedorn]]</p>
! <p>[[Gregor Erhart Fechtbuch (MS E.1939.65.354)|Glasgow Transcription]] (1533)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[{{fullurl:Index:Oplodidaskalia sive Armorvm Tractandorvm Meditatio Alberti Dvreri (MS 26-232)}} edit]&#93;</span><br/></p>
+
! <p>[[Gregor Erhart Fechtbuch (MS E.1939.65.354)|Glasgow Transcription]] (1533)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[https://wiktenauer.com/wiki/Index:Gregor_Erhart_Fechtbuch_(MS_E.1939.65.354) edit]&#93;</span><br/></p>
! <p>[[Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (MSS Dresd.C.93/C.94)|Dresden (Mair) Transcription]] (1542)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[{{fullurl:Index:Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (MS Dresd.C.93)}} edit]&#93;</span><br/>by [[Pierre-Henry Bas]]</p>
+
! <p>[[Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (MSS Dresd.C.93/C.94)|Dresden (Mair) Transcription]] (1542)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[https://wiktenauer.com/wiki/Index:Opus_Amplissimum_de_Arte_Athletica_(MS_Dresd.C.93) edit]&#93;</span><br/>by [[Pierre-Henry Bas]]</p>
! <p>[[Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (Cod.10825/10826)|Vienna (Mair) German Transcription]] (1550s)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[{{fullurl:Index:Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (Cod.10825)}} edit]&#93;</span><br/></p>
+
! <p>[[Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (Cod.10825/10826)|Vienna (Mair) German Transcription]] (1550s)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[https://wiktenauer.com/wiki/Index:Opus_Amplissimum_de_Arte_Athletica_(Cod.10825) edit]&#93;</span><br/></p>
! <p>[[Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (Cod.icon. 393)|Munich (Mair) Transcription]] (1540s)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[{{fullurl:Index:Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (Cod.icon. 393 I)}} edit]&#93;</span><br/></p>
+
! <p>[[Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (Cod.icon. 393)|Munich (Mair) Transcription]] (1540s)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[https://wiktenauer.com/wiki/Index:Opus_Amplissimum_de_Arte_Athletica_(Cod.icon._393_I) edit]&#93;</span><br/></p>
! <p>[[Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (Cod.10825/10826)|Vienna (Mair) Latin Transcription]] (1550s)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[{{fullurl:Index:Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (Cod.10825)}} edit]&#93;</span><br/></p>
+
! <p>[[Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (Cod.10825/10826)|Vienna (Mair) Latin Transcription]] (1550s)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[https://wiktenauer.com/wiki/Index:Opus_Amplissimum_de_Arte_Athletica_(Cod.10825) edit]&#93;</span><br/></p>
! <p>[[Maister Liechtenawers Kunstbuech (Cgm 3712)|Munich Ⅱ Transcription]] (1556)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[{{fullurl:Index:Maister Liechtenawers Kunstbuech (Cgm 3712)}} edit]&#93;</span><br/></p>
+
! <p>[[Maister Liechtenawers Kunstbuech (Cgm 3712)|Munich Ⅱ Transcription]] (1556)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[https://wiktenauer.com/wiki/Index:Maister_Liechtenawers_Kunstbuech_(Cgm_3712) edit]&#93;</span><br/></p>
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Cod.Pal.germ.430 001v.png|400px|center]]
+
|  
 
| <p>[1] This is the art and charter on the Messer of Sir Hans Leckuchner of Nürnberg, which he did and put together himself, the text and the explanation of it.</p>
 
| <p>[1] This is the art and charter on the Messer of Sir Hans Leckuchner of Nürnberg, which he did and put together himself, the text and the explanation of it.</p>
 
| <p>This is the art and charter on the Messer of Sir Hans Leckuchner of Nürnberg, which he did and put together himself, the text and the explanation of it to His Highness Prince and Duke Philip, Count Palatine of Rhein, Arch-Cup-bearer and Prince Elector, and Duke in Bavaria.</p>
 
| <p>This is the art and charter on the Messer of Sir Hans Leckuchner of Nürnberg, which he did and put together himself, the text and the explanation of it to His Highness Prince and Duke Philip, Count Palatine of Rhein, Arch-Cup-bearer and Prince Elector, and Duke in Bavaria.</p>
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|-  
 
|-  
 +
|
 
| <p>[2] </p>
 
| <p>[2] </p>
 
| <p>'''The foreword'''</p>
 
| <p>'''The foreword'''</p>
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|-  
 
|-  
|  
+
| rowspan="4" |  
 
| <p>[4] </p>
 
| <p>[4] </p>
 
| <p><span class="red" style="font-weight:bold;">“Simultaneously,” “before” and “after,” these words<br/>are the keep of the entire art<br/>“Weak” and “strong”-check them wisely<br/>So that you are fencing skillfully</span></p>
 
| <p><span class="red" style="font-weight:bold;">“Simultaneously,” “before” and “after,” these words<br/>are the keep of the entire art<br/>“Weak” and “strong”-check them wisely<br/>So that you are fencing skillfully</span></p>
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|-  
 
|-  
|
 
 
| <p>[5] </p>
 
| <p>[5] </p>
 
| <p><br/></p>
 
| <p><br/></p>
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|-  
 
|-  
|
 
 
| <p>[6] </p>
 
| <p>[6] </p>
 
| <p><br/></p>
 
| <p><br/></p>
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|-  
 
|-  
|
 
 
| <p>[7] </p>
 
| <p>[7] </p>
 
| <p><br/></p>
 
| <p><br/></p>
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|-  
 
|-  
|  
+
| rowspan="2" |  
 
| <p>[8] </p>
 
| <p>[8] </p>
 
| <p><br/></p>
 
| <p><br/></p>
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|-  
 
|-  
|
 
 
| <p>[9] </p>
 
| <p>[9] </p>
 
| <p>Secondly, the six hidden strokes are described and mentioned in the text, from that many good elements come, if one can perform them right and know how to prepare them skillfully. And how you should perform them with three elements, you will be taught afterwards.</p>
 
| <p>Secondly, the six hidden strokes are described and mentioned in the text, from that many good elements come, if one can perform them right and know how to prepare them skillfully. And how you should perform them with three elements, you will be taught afterwards.</p>
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|-  
 
|-  
|  
+
| rowspan="17" |  
 
| <p>[11] </p>
 
| <p>[11] </p>
 
| <p><br/></p>
 
| <p><br/></p>
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|-  
 
|-  
|
 
 
| <p>[12] </p>
 
| <p>[12] </p>
 
| <p>Then, the other element is called displacing-it is referred to as the text says: displace.</p>
 
| <p>Then, the other element is called displacing-it is referred to as the text says: displace.</p>
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|-  
 
|-  
|
 
 
| <p>[13] </p>
 
| <p>[13] </p>
 
| <p>Then, the third are the drawing after-it is referred to as it is said: drawing after.</p>
 
| <p>Then, the third are the drawing after-it is referred to as it is said: drawing after.</p>
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|-  
 
|-  
|
 
 
| <p>[14] </p>
 
| <p>[14] </p>
 
| <p>Then, the fourth are overrunning-it is referred to as it is said: run over.</p>
 
| <p>Then, the fourth are overrunning-it is referred to as it is said: run over.</p>
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|-  
 
|-  
|
 
 
| <p>[15] </p>
 
| <p>[15] </p>
 
| <p>Then, the fifth are setting off-it is referred to as it is said: set off.</p>
 
| <p>Then, the fifth are setting off-it is referred to as it is said: set off.</p>
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|-  
 
|-  
|
 
 
| <p>[16] </p>
 
| <p>[16] </p>
 
| <p>Then, the sixth are changing through-the master refers to it as he says: change through.</p>
 
| <p>Then, the sixth are changing through-the master refers to it as he says: change through.</p>
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|-  
 
|-  
|
 
 
| <p>[17] </p>
 
| <p>[17] </p>
 
| <p>Then, the seventh is called twitching-it is referred to as he says: twitch.</p>
 
| <p>Then, the seventh is called twitching-it is referred to as he says: twitch.</p>
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|-  
 
|-  
|
 
 
| <p>[18] </p>
 
| <p>[18] </p>
 
| <p>Then, the eighth are running through-they are referred to as it is said: run through.</p>
 
| <p>Then, the eighth are running through-they are referred to as it is said: run through.</p>
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|-  
 
|-  
|
 
 
| <p>[19] </p>
 
| <p>[19] </p>
 
| <p>Then, the ninth are cutting off or the four cuts-it is referred to as it is said: cutting off.</p>
 
| <p>Then, the ninth are cutting off or the four cuts-it is referred to as it is said: cutting off.</p>
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|-  
 
|-  
|
 
 
| <p>[20] </p>
 
| <p>[20] </p>
 
| <p>Then, the tenth is called pressing the hands-it is referred to as he says: press.</p>
 
| <p>Then, the tenth is called pressing the hands-it is referred to as he says: press.</p>
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|-  
 
|-  
|
 
 
| <p>[21] </p>
 
| <p>[21] </p>
 
| <p>Then, the eleventh are running off-it is referred to as he says: run off.</p>
 
| <p>Then, the eleventh are running off-it is referred to as he says: run off.</p>
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|-  
 
|-  
|
 
 
| <p>[22] </p>
 
| <p>[22] </p>
 
| <p>Then, the twelfth are taking over-it is referred to as he says: take over.</p>
 
| <p>Then, the twelfth are taking over-it is referred to as he says: take over.</p>
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|-  
 
|-  
|
 
 
| <p>[23] </p>
 
| <p>[23] </p>
 
| <p>Then, the thirteenth are going through-it is referred to as he says: go through.</p>
 
| <p>Then, the thirteenth are going through-it is referred to as he says: go through.</p>
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|-  
 
|-  
|
 
 
| <p>[24] </p>
 
| <p>[24] </p>
 
| <p>Then, the fourteenth is called the bow-it is referred to as he says bow.</p>
 
| <p>Then, the fourteenth is called the bow-it is referred to as he says bow.</p>
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|-  
 
|-  
|
 
 
| <p>[25] </p>
 
| <p>[25] </p>
 
| <p>Then, the fifteenth is called taking the Messer-it is referred to as it is said: take the defense.</p>
 
| <p>Then, the fifteenth is called taking the Messer-it is referred to as it is said: take the defense.</p>
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|-  
 
|-  
|
 
 
| <p>[26] </p>
 
| <p>[26] </p>
 
| <p>Then, the sixteenth are the hangings-they are referred to as it is said: hang.</p>
 
| <p>Then, the sixteenth are the hangings-they are referred to as it is said: hang.</p>
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|-  
 
|-  
|
 
 
| <p>[27] </p>
 
| <p>[27] </p>
 
| <p>Then, the seventeenth are winding with the Messer-the master refers to it for us as he says: wind against the openings.</p>
 
| <p>Then, the seventeenth are winding with the Messer-the master refers to it for us as he says: wind against the openings.</p>
  
<p>Thus, you have the main elements which are twenty-three. [The text] ''follows.''</p>
+
<p>Thus, you have the main elements which are twenty-three.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:MS M.I.29 048v.jpg|8|lbl=48v.8}}
 
| {{section|Page:MS M.I.29 048v.jpg|8|lbl=48v.8}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.Pal.germ.430 006v.png|6|lbl=6v.6}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.Pal.germ.430 006v.png|6|lbl=6v.6}}
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| <p><br/></p>
 
| <p><br/></p>
  
{{section|Page:MS M.I.29 050r.jpg|4|lbl=50r.4}}
+
{{section|Page:MS M.I.29 050r.jpg|5|lbl=50r.5}}
 
| <p><br/></p>
 
| <p><br/></p>
  
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|-  
 
|-  
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Cgm 582 033r.jpg|400px|center]]
+
| rowspan="3" | [[File:Cgm 582 033r.jpg|400px|center]]
 
| <p>[117] </p>
 
| <p>[117] </p>
 
| <p><br/></p>
 
| <p><br/></p>
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|-  
 
|-  
| rowspan="3" | [[File:Cgm 582 033v.jpg|400px|center]]
 
 
| <p>[119] </p>
 
| <p>[119] </p>
 
| <p><br/></p>
 
| <p><br/></p>
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|-  
 
|-  
 +
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Cgm 582 033v.jpg|400px|center]]
 
| <p>[122] </p>
 
| <p>[122] </p>
  
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| [[File:Cgm 582 049r.jpg|400px|center]]
 
| [[File:Cgm 582 049r.jpg|400px|center]]
 
| <p>[167] </p>
 
| <p>[167] </p>
 +
| <p>[No text]</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
|  
+
| {{paget|Page:Cgm 582|049r|jpg|lbl=49r|blk=1}}
|  
 
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
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| [[File:Cgm 582 049v.jpg|400px|center]]
 
| [[File:Cgm 582 049v.jpg|400px|center]]
 
| <p>[168] </p>
 
| <p>[168] </p>
 +
| <p>[No text]</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
|  
+
| {{paget|Page:Cgm 582|049r|jpg|lbl=49r|blk=1}}
|  
 
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
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<p>Then, if he holds you as before, thrust at him between both his arms with the “weak” over his right arm at the joint and raise with the hilt firmly to his left arm at the joint of the elbow and press from above downwards firmly to his right side. ''The text follows''.</p>
 
<p>Then, if he holds you as before, thrust at him between both his arms with the “weak” over his right arm at the joint and raise with the hilt firmly to his left arm at the joint of the elbow and press from above downwards firmly to his right side. ''The text follows''.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
|  
+
| <p><br/></p>
 +
 
 +
{{section|Page:MS M.I.29 063r.jpg|3|lbl=63r.3}}
 
| <p><br/></p>
 
| <p><br/></p>
  
 
{{section|Page:Cod.Pal.germ.430 033r.png|2|lbl=33r.2}}
 
{{section|Page:Cod.Pal.germ.430 033r.png|2|lbl=33r.2}}
 
|  
 
|  
| <p><br/></p>
+
|  
 
 
{{section|Page:MS M.I.29 063r.jpg|3|lbl=63r.3}}
 
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
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|-  
 
|-  
 
| [[File:Cgm 582 067v.jpg|400px|center]]
 
| [[File:Cgm 582 067v.jpg|400px|center]]
| <p>[212] </p>
+
| <p>[212] Then, if you want, let the Messer go through and strike at him again with the blunt or the sharp edge at his right side to the upper peak. And what the going through is, you will be taught afterwards.</p>
| <p>Then, if you want, let the Messer go through and strike at him again with the blunt or the sharp edge at his right side to the upper peak. And what the going through is, you will be taught afterwards.</p>
+
| <p>Then, if you want, let the Messer go through and strike at him again with the blunt or the sharp edge at his right side to the upper peak. And what the going through is, you will be taught afterwards. And make sure that you do the going through according to my meaning, as I have stated them to be different in the Messer than in the sword.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:MS M.I.29 067r.jpg|3|lbl=67r.3}}
 
| {{section|Page:MS M.I.29 067r.jpg|3|lbl=67r.3}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.Pal.germ.430 037v.png|2|lbl=37v.2}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.Pal.germ.430 037v.png|2|lbl=37v.2}}
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|-  
 
|-  
 
| <p>[520] </p>
 
| <p>[520] </p>
| <p>Then, these elements are to be performed against these who run into and eagerly fight high and short, or do the hurling strokes against the man, and also leap with hurling strokes to the man. Thus, you have the stork’s beak and against which element or peculiarity you should do it, you are just taught. [The text] ''follows.''</p>
+
| <p>Then, these elements are to be performed against these who run into and eagerly fight high and short, or do the hurling strokes against the man, and also leap with hurling strokes to the man. Thus, you have the stork’s beak and against which element or peculiarity you should do it, you are just taught.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:MS M.I.29 107v.jpg|1|lbl=107v.1}}
 
| {{section|Page:MS M.I.29 107v.jpg|1|lbl=107v.1}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.Pal.germ.430 097v.png|2|lbl=97v.2}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.Pal.germ.430 097v.png|2|lbl=97v.2}}
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|-  
 
|-  
 
| <p>[589] </p>
 
| <p>[589] </p>
| <p>Thus, Sir Hans Lecküchner of Nuremberg has done, composed and finished this book. God send him the Holy Blessing, and forgive him evil, misdeeds and sins, and give him His Charitable Divine Grace and Salvation.</p>
+
| <p>Thus, Sir Hans Lecküchner of Nuremberg has made, composed, and finished this book. God send him the Holy Blessing, and forgive him evil, misdeeds, and sins, and give him His Charitable Divine Grace and Salvation.</p>
  
 
<p>Amen.</p>
 
<p>Amen.</p>
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|-  
 
|-  
 
| <p>[590] </p>
 
| <p>[590] </p>
| <p>This matter has been composed by Sir Johannes Lecküchner, at that time the parish priest in Herzogenaurach, AD. 1478, but this book has been written and completed AD. 82 in the eve of St Sebastian.<ref>19/20 January</ref></p>
+
| <p>This material has been composed by Reverend Hans Lecküchner, at the time parish priest in Herzogenaurach, in the year of our Lord 1478, but this book has been written and completed the in 82nd year on the eve of St Sebastian.<ref>19/20 January.</ref></p>
 
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{| class="master sortable"
 
{| class="master sortable"
 
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|-  
! <p>Illustrations<br/>from the Heidelberg and Munich</p>
+
! <p>Illustrations<br/>from the Heidelberg</p>
! <p>{{rating|C|Partial Translation (from the Heidelberg)}}<br/>by [[Grzegorz&nbsp;Żabiński]], [[Russell&nbsp;A.&nbsp;Mitchell]], [[Falko&nbsp;Fritz]]</p>
+
! <p>{{rating|C|Draft Translation (from the Heidelberg)}}<br/>by [[Grzegorz&nbsp;Żabiński]], [[Russell&nbsp;A.&nbsp;Mitchell]], [[Falko&nbsp;Fritz]]</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|C|Draft Translation (from the Munich)}}<br/>by [[Grzegorz&nbsp;Żabiński]], [[Russell&nbsp;A.&nbsp;Mitchell]], [[Falko&nbsp;Fritz]]</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|C|Draft Translation (from the Munich)}}<br/>by [[Grzegorz&nbsp;Żabiński]], [[Russell&nbsp;A.&nbsp;Mitchell]], [[Falko&nbsp;Fritz]]</p>
! <p>[[Codex Speyer (MS M.I.29)|Salzburg Transcription]] (1491){{edit index|Codex Speyer (MS M.I.29)}}<br/>by [[Dierk Hagedorn]]</p>
+
! <p>[[Codex Speyer (MS M.I.29)|Salzburg Transcription]] (1491)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[https://wiktenauer.com/wiki/Index:Codex_Speyer_(MS_M.I.29) edit]&#93;</span><br/>by [[Dierk Hagedorn]]</p>
! <p>[[Kunst des Messerfechtens (Cod.Pal.Germ.430)|Heidelberg Transcription]] (1478)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[{{fullurl:Index:Kunst des Messerfechtens (Cod.Pal.Germ.430)}} edit]&#93;</span><br/>by [[Grzegorz&nbsp;Żabiński]], [[Russell&nbsp;A.&nbsp;Mitchell]], [[Falko&nbsp;Fritz]]</p>
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! <p>[[Kunst des Messerfechtens (Cod.Pal.Germ.430)|Heidelberg Transcription]] (1478)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[https://wiktenauer.com/wiki/Index:Kunst_des_Messerfechtens_(Cod.Pal.Germ.430) edit]&#93;</span><br/>by [[Grzegorz&nbsp;Żabiński]], [[Russell&nbsp;A.&nbsp;Mitchell]], [[Falko&nbsp;Fritz]]</p>
! <p>[[Kunst des Messerfechtens (Cgm 582)|Munich Ⅰ Transcription]] (1482)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[{{fullurl:Index:Kunst des Messerfechtens (Cgm 582)}} edit]&#93;</span><br/>by [[Carsten Lorbeer|Carsten]]&nbsp;and&nbsp;[[Julia&nbsp;Lorbeer]], [[Johann&nbsp;Heim]], [[Robert&nbsp;Brunner]], [[Alex&nbsp;Kiermayer]]</p>
+
! <p>[[Kunst des Messerfechtens (Cgm 582)|Munich Ⅰ Transcription]] (1482)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[https://wiktenauer.com/wiki/Index:Kunst_des_Messerfechtens_(Cgm_582) edit]&#93;</span><br/>by [[Carsten&nbsp;Lorbeer]], [[Julia&nbsp;Lorbeer]], [[Johann&nbsp;Heim]], [[Robert&nbsp;Brunner]], [[Alex&nbsp;Kiermayer]]</p>
! <p>[[Oplodidaskalia sive Armorvm Tractandorvm Meditatio Alberti Dvreri (MS 26-232)|Vienna Transcription]] (1512)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[{{fullurl:Index:Oplodidaskalia sive Armorvm Tractandorvm Meditatio Alberti Dvreri (MS 26-232)}} edit]&#93;</span><br/>by [[Dierk Hagedorn]]</p>
+
! <p>[[Oplodidaskalia sive Armorvm Tractandorvm Meditatio Alberti Dvreri (MS 26-232)|Vienna Transcription]] (1512)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[https://wiktenauer.com/wiki/Index:Oplodidaskalia_sive_Armorvm_Tractandorvm_Meditatio_Alberti_Dvreri_(MS_26-232) edit]&#93;</span><br/>by [[Dierk Hagedorn]]</p>
! <p>[[Gregor Erhart Fechtbuch (MS E.1939.65.354)|Glasgow Transcription]] (1533)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[{{fullurl:Index:Oplodidaskalia sive Armorvm Tractandorvm Meditatio Alberti Dvreri (MS 26-232)}} edit]&#93;</span><br/></p>
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! <p>[[Gregor Erhart Fechtbuch (MS E.1939.65.354)|Glasgow Transcription]] (1533)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[https://wiktenauer.com/wiki/Index:Gregor_Erhart_Fechtbuch_(MS_E.1939.65.354) edit]&#93;</span><br/></p>
! <p>[[Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (MSS Dresd.C.93/C.94)|Dresden (Mair) Transcription]] (1542)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[{{fullurl:Index:Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (MS Dresd.C.93)}} edit]&#93;</span><br/>by [[Pierre-Henry Bas]]</p>
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! <p>[[Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (MSS Dresd.C.93/C.94)|Dresden (Mair) Transcription]] (1542)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[https://wiktenauer.com/wiki/Index:Opus_Amplissimum_de_Arte_Athletica_(MS_Dresd.C.93) edit]&#93;</span><br/>by [[Pierre-Henry Bas]]</p>
! <p>[[Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (Cod.10825/10826)|Vienna (Mair) German Transcription]] (1550s)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[{{fullurl:Index:Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (Cod.10825)}} edit]&#93;</span><br/></p>
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! <p>[[Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (Cod.10825/10826)|Vienna (Mair) German Transcription]] (1550s)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[https://wiktenauer.com/wiki/Index:Opus_Amplissimum_de_Arte_Athletica_(Cod.10825) edit]&#93;</span><br/></p>
! <p>[[Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (Cod.icon. 393)|Munich (Mair) Transcription]] (1540s)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[{{fullurl:Index:Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (Cod.icon. 393 I)}} edit]&#93;</span><br/></p>
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! <p>[[Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (Cod.icon. 393)|Munich (Mair) Transcription]] (1540s)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[https://wiktenauer.com/wiki/Index:Opus_Amplissimum_de_Arte_Athletica_(Cod.icon._393_I) edit]&#93;</span><br/></p>
! <p>[[Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (Cod.10825/10826)|Vienna (Mair) Latin Transcription]] (1550s)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[{{fullurl:Index:Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (Cod.10825)}} edit]&#93;</span><br/></p>
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! <p>[[Opus Amplissimum de Arte Athletica (Cod.10825/10826)|Vienna (Mair) Latin Transcription]] (1550s)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[https://wiktenauer.com/wiki/Index:Opus_Amplissimum_de_Arte_Athletica_(Cod.10825) edit]&#93;</span><br/></p>
! <p>[[Maister Liechtenawers Kunstbuech (Cgm 3712)|Munich Transcription]] (1556)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[{{fullurl:Index:Maister Liechtenawers Kunstbuech (Cgm 3712)}} edit]&#93;</span><br/></p>
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! <p>[[Maister Liechtenawers Kunstbuech (Cgm 3712)|Munich Transcription]] (1556)&nbsp;<span class="noprint plainlinks" style="font-weight:normal; font-size:85%;">&#91;[https://wiktenauer.com/wiki/Index:Maister_Liechtenawers_Kunstbuech_(Cgm_3712) edit]&#93;</span><br/></p>
  
 
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| [[File:Cod.Pal.germ.430 001v.png|400px|center]]
 
| <p>[1] Illustrious and Very Mighty Prince etc Philip! Since the excellent art of fighting has not been invented by mediocres nor people of minor importance and by no means from the nature of the thing, but by magnificent men of sharpest ability, and so that military exercises be proven by it, You master rightfully this art with greatest vigilance to whatever place You will and commonly and in armour, as much as it belongs to a Prince, and You soundly have both its art and practice.</p>
 
| <p>[1] Illustrious and Very Mighty Prince etc Philip! Since the excellent art of fighting has not been invented by mediocres nor people of minor importance and by no means from the nature of the thing, but by magnificent men of sharpest ability, and so that military exercises be proven by it, You master rightfully this art with greatest vigilance to whatever place You will and commonly and in armour, as much as it belongs to a Prince, and You soundly have both its art and practice.</p>
  
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Latest revision as of 21:21, 4 September 2021

Johannes Lecküchner
Born ca. 1430s
Nuremberg, Germany
Died December 31, 1482
Herzogenaurach, Germany
Occupation
Alma mater University of Leipzig
Influences Johannes Liechtenauer (?)
Genres Fencing manual
Language Early New High German
Notable work(s) Kunst des Messerfechtens
Archetype(s)
Manuscript(s)
Concordance by Michael Chidester
Translations
Signature Johannes Lecküchner Sig.jpg

Johannes Lecküchner (or Hans Lebkommer; ca. 1430s – 1482) was a 15th century German cleric and fencing master. He was born in the Nuremberg area, and in 1455 he was inscribed at the University of Leipzig. In 1457, he received the title of baccalaureus, and he was consecrated as a Catholic acolyte in 1459. At some point before creating his first manuscript in 1478, Lecküchner was consecrated as a priest. From 1480 until his death on December 31, 1482, he was employed as a communal priest in Herzogenaurach, Germany.[1] Lecküchner dedicated his fencing manual to Philip "the Upright" of Wittelsbach, Elector Palatine of the Rhine, but the nature of his connection to the duke remains unclear.[2]

Some 19th century scholars assumed that Lecküchner's name was a corruption of "Liechtenauer" and a reference to Johannes Liechtenauer, the grand master of the primary German longsword tradition. However, biographical information from historical records, as well as the colophon in the manuscript itself, thoroughly disproves this theory. Lecküchner's system of Messer fencing does, however, seem to be related in some way to the longsword teachings of Liechtenauer from the previous century. His teachings are organized in a similar fashion using similar terminology, and often his Recital (Zettel) is nearly identical to that of Liechtenauer.

Two potentially-autograph copies of Lecküchner's treatise are preserved: the Cod. Pal. Germ. 430, completed in 1478, and the Cgm 582, completed on 19 January 1482 (the year of his death).[3] The Cgm 582 mentions in the last paragraph that a previous draft had been produced, which is presumed to be a reference to the CPG 430. Despite the Cgm 582 being the more extensive and elaborate of the two, it is the CPG 430 that seems to be the source for all later repetitions of Lecküchner's teachings. A slightly abridged version of this treatise (probably based on a lost intermediary) was included by Hans von Speyer in the MS M.I.29 in 1491, and similar (but not identical) abridged versions were reproduced by Gregor Erhart in 1533, Paulus Hector Mair in the 1540s, and Lienhart Sollinger in 1556.

Preceding the treatises of Lecküchner and Liechtenauer in the MS M.I.29 are brief notes by a Magister Andreas explaining equivalences in concepts and terminology between the two,[4] perhaps indicating that by this time Lecküchner's teachings had been integrated into the Liechtenauer school of fencing. This notion is further supported by the appearance of Lecküchner's Recital alongside Liechtenauer's in Marxbrüder captain Peter Falkner's treatise of ca. 1495.

One final note of interest is that in 1531, printer Christian Egenolff published a fencing anthology entitled Der Altenn Fechter anfengliche kunst, and included in it a brief treatise on the Messer attributed to a certain Master Hans Lebkommer. This is either a misspelling or alternate rendering of "Lecküchner"; the text appears to be a brief summary of Lecküchner's teachings, intermingled with the Messer teachings of Andre Paurenfeyndt (uncredited). Since there is no indication that it was actually written by Lecküchner (who was long dead by that time), and in order to avoid confusion here, this otherwise anonymous treatise can be found on the Lebkommer page.

Treatise

The two manuscripts whose creation seems to have been personally overseen by Lecküchner contain a number of substantial differences, some of which can be interpreted as corrections in the later edition and others which are less explicable. In this compilation, they're treated as mutually-authoritative and translated separately; it's possible that a future version of this article will merge the translations together and describe the differences in footnotes. Both of these manuscripts were prepared late in Lecküchner's life based on one or more lost earlier versions. The Salzburg version seems likely to be a faithful copy of one of those versions, so it is presented in the first transcription column to illustrate how the text expanded over time.

The typical Wiktenauer style is to break up the Recital into verses in a standard fashion according to their rhyme scheme. In the case of Lecküchner, however, the Recital is already broken into discrete lines in most extant copies, but the precise separation varies from copy to copy. The format of the various copies has therefore been preserved in this table in order to allow comparison (even though that means leaving the Vienna version completely un-separated). In the translation, the verses that are common to multiple copies are rendered in red text, while the verses that are unique to Munich version Ⅰ appear in black text.

To view a version of this table without illustrations, see Johannes Lecküchner/No illustrations.