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# Munich 87v / PDF page 20
 
# Munich 87v / PDF page 20
 
[[File:Cod.icon._393_I_087v.jpg|thumb|Page scan]]
 
[[File:Cod.icon._393_I_087v.jpg|thumb|Page scan]]
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== Missing Zettel verses from Dresden 94v (26) ==
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[[File:MS_Dresd.C.93_094v.png|thumb|Page image]]
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=== German ===
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: Schiller einbricht
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: was puffel schlecht oder sticht
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: wer wechsel trawt
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: schiller In daraus beraupt •
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=== English  (Fritz) ===
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: Schieler breaks
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: what buffalo strikes or thrusts.
 +
: A threat with a Wechsel
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: is bereft with a Schielhau.
  
 
== 87v a ==
 
== 87v a ==

Latest revision as of 05:37, 7 March 2021

  1. Munich 87v / PDF page 20
Page scan

Missing Zettel verses from Dresden 94v (26)

Page image

German

Schiller einbricht
was puffel schlecht oder sticht
wer wechsel trawt
schiller In daraus beraupt •

English (Fritz)

Schieler breaks
what buffalo strikes or thrusts.
A threat with a Wechsel
is bereft with a Schielhau.

87v a

87v a Latin

SEQUUNTUR VARII usus ictus eius q[ui] à limis oculis appellationem, adeptus, nobis strabo dicitur

Is ictus habitus gravis et severus est, nam hostem vi obruit ictibus et punctionibus, formaturque ense converso: quo circa multi Athleticae magistri hunc ignorant, tum etiam aratri nescij prorsus.

Eum habitum vel ictum hac conditione exerceto, Si in conspectum adversarij processeris, sinistrum proponas pedem. ensem humero dextro admotum contineas, et si eveniat, ut hostis é superné feriat versus caput tuum, ense converso, sinistrum dextro adiungas pedi, atque acie brevi porrectim brachijs extentis, super ipsius gladio contra ipsius ictum vel faciem vel pectus ferias, at si adversarius hac astutia usus; ensem tuum non contigerit, verum inferné transmittat, tum contra ipsius visum brachijs porrectis mucronem porrigens resistas, et inde laedere adversarius te nequibit, neque traiectione uti.


87v a English

Here follows a variation using his thrust which is called the side-eye thrust, having inherited it, it is called the squinter by us.

This strike is a serious and strict gesture, for it overwhelms the enemy with strength of strokes and pricking, and it is shaped by converting the sword: for which reason many masters of Athletics are ignorant concerning this, then again, they are entirely ignorant of the plow.

Employ the gesture or thrust using these conditions: If you advance into view of the adversary, set the left foot before. you should contain the sword with a movement, and if it happens, in order that the opponent strikes from above toward your head, turning the sword, you should join the left to the right foot (?), and the arms having been stretched out [and] the long edge extended, strike his sword above against his strike or face or chest, and if the adversary uses this trick; your sword now contacts, in truth it goes across underneath, then you oppose extending the sword against his face the shoulder having been extended, and thence the adversary cannot strike you, nor use the transfer.

87v a Latin (Sandbox)

  1. SEQUUNTUR VARII
  2. usus ictus eius q[ui] à limis oculis appellationem,
  3. adeptus, nobis strabo dicitur
  1. Is ictus habitus gravis et severus est,
  2. nam hostem vi obruit ictibus et punctionibus,
  3. formaturque ense converso:
  4. quo circa multi Athleticae magistri hunc ignorant,
  5. tum etiam aratri nescij prorsus.
  1. Eum habitum vel ictum hac conditione exerceto,
  2. Si in conspectum adversarij processeris,
  3. sinistrum proponas pedem.
  4. ensem humero dextro admotum contineas,
  5. et si eveniat,
  6. ut hostis é superné feriat versus caput tuum,
  7. ense converso,
  8. sinistrum dextro adiungas pedi,
  9. atque acie brevi porrectim brachijs extentis,
  10. super ipsius gladio contra ipsius ictum vel faciem vel pectus ferias,
  11. at si adversarius hac astutia usus;
  12. ensem tuum non contigerit,
  13. verum inferné transmittat,
  14. tum contra ipsius visum brachijs porrectis mucronem porrigens resistas,
  15. et inde laedere adversarius te nequibit,
  16. neque traiectione uti.

87v a English (Sandbox)

  1. Here follows a variation
  2. using[^1] his thrust which is called the side-eye thrust,
  3. having inherited it, it is called the squinter by us.
  1. This strike is a serious and strict gesture,
  2. for it overwhelms the enemy with strength of strokes and pricking,
  3. and it is shaped by inverting the sword:
  4. for which reason many masters of Athletics are ignorant[^2] concerning this,
  5. then again, they are entirely ignorant of the plow.
  1. Practice the gesture or thrust using these conditions:
  2. If you advance into view of the adversary,
  3. set the left foot before.
  4. you should contain the sword with a movement,
  5. and if it happens,
  6. in order that the opponent strikes from above against your head,
  7. inverting the sword,
  8. you should join the left to the right foot (?),
  9. and the arms having been stretched out [and] the long edge extended,
  10. strike his sword above against his strike or face or chest,
  11. and if the adversary uses this trick;
  12. your sword now contacts,
  13. in truth it goes across underneath,
  14. then you oppose extending the sword against his face the shoulder having been extended,
  15. and thence the adversary cannot strike you,
  16. nor use the transfer.


87v a notes

[^1]: what is this grammar doing why [^2]: should ignorant and nescij have different meanings in english?


two phrases for one concept habitum or ictum (not in german)and aren’t those a mess to translate also, parallel construction for different targets (two out of three in german)


87v b

87v b Latin

ALIUS HABITUS.

SEQUITUR alius habitus.

Si contra hostem consistas, iuxta humerum dextrum ensem tenens, is autem in custodia Aratri contrà consistat, minaturque punctionem infernam, tunc tu superné porrectim aciem brevem praemittens ictum à limis oculis nominatum ferias, atque mucronem vel contra visum ipsius vel pectus inde impellito, et ea ratione si fueris usus, adversarius inferné te pungendo adprehendere nequibit.

87v b English

Another gesture

Another gesture follows. If you would stand fast against the enemy, holding the sword near to the right upper arm, But he stands against [you] in the Plow guard, and threatens a lower puncture, then YOU sending forward the extended short edge above, strike the blow called side eye, and from there drive/thrust the point either against his face or his breast, and if you used this method, the adversary cannot overtake you with lower pricking/strike.

87v b Latin (Sandbox)

  1. ALIUS HABITUS.
  1. SEQUITUR alius habitus.
  2. Si contra hostem consistas,
  3. iuxta humerum dextrum ensem tenens,
  4. is autem in custodia Aratri contrà consistat,
  5. minaturque punctionem infernam,
  6. tunc tu superné porrectim aciem brevem praemittens,
  7. ictum à limis oculis nominatum ferias,
  8. atque mucronem vel contra visum ipsius vel pectus inde impellito,
  9. et ea ratione si fueris usus,
  10. adversarius inferné te pungendo adprehendere nequibit.

87v b English (Sandbox)

  1. Another gesture[^3]
  1. Another gesture follows.
  2. If you would stand fast against the enemy,
  3. holding the sword near to the right upper arm,
  4. But he stands against [you] in the Plow guard,
  5. and threatens a lower puncture,
  6. then YOU sending forward the extended short edge above,
  7. strike the blow called side eye,
  8. and from there drive/thrust the point either against his face or his breast,
  9. and if you used this method,
  10. the adversary cannot overtake you with lower pricking/strike.


87v b notes

[^3]: I'm less sure about this habitus, since the text here is a lot of how to stand and a little how to move... but i figure lines 1-2 should match


parallel construction, two targets, present in german