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Difference between revisions of "Jud Ebreesch"

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| <p>My willing service unto ''the'' beloved Lord – I let ye wit that indeed. Well and healthy may ''the'' body feel – ''yet'' clemency resides in God. Just like lancing, I also gladly keep all oaths, ye beloved lords.</p>
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| <p>My willing service unto ''the'' beloved Lord—I let ye wit that indeed. Well and healthy may ''the'' body feel—''yet'' clemency resides in God. Just like lancing, I also gladly keep all oaths, ye beloved lords.</p>
 
| {{section|page:Ms.Thott.290.2º 150r.jpg|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|page:Ms.Thott.290.2º 150r.jpg|5|lbl=-}}
  
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| <p>Thus they ''who'' always naysay ''shall'' then at last answer ''for that'' – Chemnitz</p>
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| <p>Thus they ''who'' always naysay ''shall'' then at last answer ''for that''—Chemnitz</p>
 
| {{section|page:Ms.Thott.290.2º 150r.jpg|8|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|page:Ms.Thott.290.2º 150r.jpg|8|lbl=-}}
  

Revision as of 23:28, 7 December 2015

Jud Ebreesch
Died 15th century
Ethnicity Jewish
Influenced Hans Talhoffer
Language Early New High German
Manuscript(s) MS Thott.290.2º (1459)

Jud Ebreesch is the attribution given for the treatise on esoterica at the back of a ca. 1459 manuscript owned by Hans Talhoffer (MS Thott.290.2º). As Jud means "Jew" and Ebreesch means "Hebrew", the name is likely to be a pseudonym, leaving the author entirely unknown.

Treatise

Additional Resources

References