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| '''THE TREATY CONTAINING THE SECRETS OF THE FIRST BOOK ON THE SWORD ALONE, MOTHER OF'''
 
| '''THE TREATY CONTAINING THE SECRETS OF THE FIRST BOOK ON THE SWORD ALONE, MOTHER OF'''
  
all fencing, which includes dagger, cape, targe, buckler, rondel, two handed swords, and dual-wielding swords with portraitures, that have the weapon in hand for throwing strikes to defend and offend at the same time, both offensively and defensively, which is very useful and advantageous to become a skillful noble and disciples of Mars; written for art, order, and practice.
+
all weapons, which includes sword and dagger, cape, targe, buckler, rondel; two handed swords; and dual-wielding swords with portraitures that show the weapon in hand for throwing strikes to defend and offend at the same time, both offensively and defensively, which is very useful and advantageous to become a skillful noble and disciples of Mars; written for the art, order, and practice.
  
 
''Written by Provencal Gentleman Henry de Saint Didier.''
 
''Written by Provencal Gentleman Henry de Saint Didier.''
  
DEDICATED TO THE MAJESTY OF THE VERY CHRISTIAN KING CHARLES THE NINTH.
+
DEDICATED TO THE MAJESTY OF THE MOST CHRISTIAN KING CHARLES THE NINTH.
  
 
PARIS, ''Printed by Jean Mettayer, and Matthurin Challenge, and is sold at Jean Dalier, on the Saint Michel bridge, to the sign of the White Rose,'' 1573.
 
PARIS, ''Printed by Jean Mettayer, and Matthurin Challenge, and is sold at Jean Dalier, on the Saint Michel bridge, to the sign of the White Rose,'' 1573.
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| LETTER TO THE KING.
 
| LETTER TO THE KING.
  
SIRE, It does not please me to say how many are to be praised for those who strive, as they say, to help or even perfect the nature of reducing confusion to order, and in such a way that the face of it appeared rough, sick, and inaccessible; was made easy, accessible, and approachable by them. Even though the only harm that results from confusion and disorder, and among other things that are proper to the Gentlemen make them quite recommendable. Why would I turn my pen elsewhere to show you that to restore a battle that is in disarray, to put it back in its previous order, that a leader must be familiar with two things. To make certain decisions to save time and the place, where and when to stop the broken ranks and by a feint to divert the enemies, while the remaining troops reform and regroup. That decision cannot be acquired, even the reason for it cannot be believed without the second point that I the leader must make is truly necessary, which is having the experience of things, from which arises the aforementioned decision. SIRE, whoever wants to put art or doctrine back in order to avoid confusion lest in the end it will be wasted, decision is required, arising from the experience seen through the exercise of the said art which I have from having served in battle, very much for your grandfather as well as for your Majesty, for twenty years in Piedmont and elsewhere. I can justly attribute to myself having used my life to experience such arms, so much so that accumulating such evidence may have allowed me to to perfect the art and the practice of them. So seeing how confused and disordered they have been and are for today by everyone shown and practiced, have in my mind figured some model or idea, which as an example, I make sure that the order will not only be good so the art that consists of it will be completely restored, and will reach closer to perfection which I have longed for, both because of my powerlessness and extreme poverty (the enemy of good spirits) as well as to be prevented from serving you, kept hidden and buried among my papers in my office where the Muses after martial efforts made me, and hope that will keep me company. But I now have the desire to give you a most humble and pleasant service, far from the zeal that all my life I have had to fencing and to those who enjoy them and who make a profession of them have allowed little, that in this time when Mars gives us some respite, I have not been emboldened to present myself to your Majesty, something not worthy of such a great Monarch, but very suitable for the exercise of a common man, both in war and in peace, namely a treatise on the sword alone, mother of all fencing, that I wrote according to my opinions, which contains six points that I declare had never been organized and their proofs, both by reason and by effect attached to the end. SIRE, this here will contain this little work, which is like a summary or collection of the first book that I still have beside me. If your Majesty appreciates this, with God giving me the grace to live, I hope by means of your Majesty to later enlighten others. Therefore, you who is first and foremost to drive skill to the nobility, I thought you who is the patron of fencing worthy of this treatise, begging you most humbly where and when it would be reputed by other, to please take my ardent affection, which for a long time has been dedicated to offer you the most humble and pleasant service in payment for employing me for something of which this concerns, and I will be more than happy with endless opportunity and will, more than great to pray to the Sovereign Rector of the Universe to give you a long and happy life, and for the boundary of your Empire to only be the Sea.
+
SIRE, It does not please me to say how many are to be praised for those who strive, as they say, to help or even perfect the nature of reducing confusion to order, and in such a way that the face of it appeared rough, sick, and inaccessible; was made easy, accessible, and approachable by them. Even though the only harm that results from confusion and disorder, and among other things that are proper to the Gentlemen make them quite recommendable. Why would I turn my pen elsewhere to show you that to restore a battle that is in disarray, to put it back in its previous order, that a leader must be familiar with two things. To make certain decisions to save time and the place, where and when to stop the broken ranks and by a feint to divert the enemies, while the remaining troops reform and regroup. That decision cannot be acquired, even the reason for it cannot be believed without the second point that I the leader must make is truly necessary, which is having the experience of things, from which arises the aforementioned decision. SIRE, whoever wants to put art or doctrine back in order to avoid confusion lest in the end it will be wasted, decision is required, arising from the experience seen through the exercise of the said art which I have from having served in battle, very much for your grandfather as well as for your Majesty, for twenty years in Piedmont and elsewhere. I can justly attribute to myself having used my life to experience such arms, so much so that accumulating such evidence may have allowed me to to perfect the art and the practice of them. So seeing how confused and disordered they have been and are for today by everyone shown and practiced, have in my mind figured some model or idea, which as an example, I make sure that the order will not only be good so the art that consists of it will be completely restored, and will reach closer to perfection which I have longed for, both because of my powerlessness and extreme poverty (the enemy of good spirits) as well as to be prevented from serving you, kept hidden and buried among my papers in my office where the Muses after martial efforts made me, and hope that will keep me company. But I now have the desire to give you a most humble and pleasant service, far from the zeal that all my life I have had to fencing and to those who enjoy them and who make a profession of them have allowed little, that in this time when Mars gives us some respite, I have not been emboldened to present myself to your Majesty, something not worthy of such a great Monarch, but very suitable for the exercise of a common man, both in war and in peace, namely a treatise on the sword alone, mother of all weapons, that I wrote according to my opinions, which contains six points that I declare had never been organized and their proofs, both by reason and by effect attached to the end. SIRE, this here will contain this little work, which is like a summary or collection of the first book that I still have beside me. If your Majesty appreciates this, with God giving me the grace to live, I hope by means of your Majesty to later enlighten others. Therefore, you who is first and foremost to drive skill to the nobility, I thought you who is the patron of fencing worthy of this treatise, begging you most humbly where and when it would be reputed by other, to please take my ardent affection, which for a long time has been dedicated to offer you the most humble and pleasant service in payment for employing me for something of which this concerns, and I will be more than happy with endless opportunity and will, more than great to pray to the Sovereign Rector of the Universe to give you a long and happy life, and for the boundary of your Empire to only be the Sea.
  
 
   
 
   
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|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| ''The following six points are required to understand and above all to best execute the secrets of the sword alone and all other weapons that are dependent.''
+
| ''The following six points are required to understand and above all else to best execute the secrets of the sword alone and all other weapons that are dependent.''
  
The first is to know how many types of steps there are in the art of said fencing, to choose the best, and to give an explanation.
+
The first is how many types of steps there are in the art of said fencing, how to choose the best, and to explain why.
  
 
| ''S’ensuivent les secrets de ceste espée seule, & de toutes les autres armes qui en dépendent, pour lesquels entendre, & sur tout mieux executer, six poinct sont requis.''
 
| ''S’ensuivent les secrets de ceste espée seule, & de toutes les autres armes qui en dépendent, pour lesquels entendre, & sur tout mieux executer, six poinct sont requis.''
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|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The fourth: how many clean targets can be listed for the said strikes on a person, both in attacking as well as in defending.
+
| The fourth: how many distinct targets can be listed for the said strikes on a person, both in attacking as well as in defending.
  
 
| Le quatriesme, en combien de lieux propres se peuvent adapter lesdits coups sur la personne, tant en assaillant, qu’en deffendant.
 
| Le quatriesme, en combien de lieux propres se peuvent adapter lesdits coups sur la personne, tant en assaillant, qu’en deffendant.
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|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
|The fifth is namely to all those who make or will make the profession of teaching the said fencing: being able to defend and offend at the same time some strike or strikes that one can throw, and thus if they do not know how can they teach their disciples.
+
|The fifth is namely for all those who make or will make it their profession by teaching the said fencing: being able to defend and offend at the same time some strike or strikes that one can throw, and thus if they do not know how can they teach their disciples.
  
 
| Le cinquiesme, sçavoir, à tous ceux qui font, ou feront, cy aprés profession de monstrer audites armes : soy deffendre & offencer à un mesme temps de quelque coup ou coups qu’on peut tirer, & par ainsi s’ils ne les sçavent comment les pourront ils monstrer à leurs disciples.
 
| Le cinquiesme, sçavoir, à tous ceux qui font, ou feront, cy aprés profession de monstrer audites armes : soy deffendre & offencer à un mesme temps de quelque coup ou coups qu’on peut tirer, & par ainsi s’ils ne les sçavent comment les pourront ils monstrer à leurs disciples.
Line 163: Line 163:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| And in order to follow the experienced well and imitate them, of two good things one must choose the better, and of two bad things to avoid both if possible and if not at least avoid the worse, and in doing so I advise all said adherents to take the better of the said two steps, which is the one where you stand on the left foot initially with weapons in hand to make one of the said three drawings.
+
| And in order to effectively follow the teachers and imitate them, one must choose the better of two good things, and of two bad things to avoid both if possible and if not at least avoid the worse; and in doing so I advise all said adherents to take the better of the said two steps, which is the one where you stand on the left foot initially with weapons in hand to make one of the said three drawings.
  
 
| Et pour bien suivre les doctes, & les immiter, faut de deux choses bonnes choisir la meilleure, & de deux mauvaises, eviter les deux, si faire se peut, sinon la pire, & en ce faisant, je conseille à tous lesdits suppots de prendre la meilleure desdites deux desmarches, qui est celle qu’on se tient sur le pied gauche pour la premiere fois, en mettant les armes au poing, faisant un desdits trois desgainements.
 
| Et pour bien suivre les doctes, & les immiter, faut de deux choses bonnes choisir la meilleure, & de deux mauvaises, eviter les deux, si faire se peut, sinon la pire, & en ce faisant, je conseille à tous lesdits suppots de prendre la meilleure desdites deux desmarches, qui est celle qu’on se tient sur le pied gauche pour la premiere fois, en mettant les armes au poing, faisant un desdits trois desgainements.
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|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| Some demonstrators, when they define the said guards, start at the top. As for me, I start on the bottom, since everything begins at the foundations. For example, learned people do not start by teaching advanced level sciences; neither do masons start on the buildings when they construct houses; they start on the foundations. And so I start on the low guard which is the foundation to guarding well.
+
| Some demonstrators, when they define the said guards, start at the top. As for me, I start on the bottom, since everything begins at the foundations. For example, learned people do not start by teaching advanced level sciences; neither do masons start on the buildings when they construct houses; they start on the foundations. And so I start on the low guard which is the foundation to guarding effectively.
  
 
| Les aucuns demonstrateurs, quand ils definissent lesdites gardes, accommencent à la haute. Quant à moy, je commence à la basse, attendu que toutes choses se commencent aux fondements. Comme pour exemple, les gens doctes ne commencent à monstrer les sciences aux hautes, ne les maçons quand ils viennent à commencer à bastir les maisons, ne commencent pas à la tuille, ains au fondement. Et par ainsi je commence à la basse, qui est le fondement qu’on doit bien garder.
 
| Les aucuns demonstrateurs, quand ils definissent lesdites gardes, accommencent à la haute. Quant à moy, je commence à la basse, attendu que toutes choses se commencent aux fondements. Comme pour exemple, les gens doctes ne commencent à monstrer les sciences aux hautes, ne les maçons quand ils viennent à commencer à bastir les maisons, ne commencent pas à la tuille, ains au fondement. Et par ainsi je commence à la basse, qui est le fondement qu’on doit bien garder.
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|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| These said two guards created by the said low is often done for drawing some ignorant strikes who makes either a high right-hand or a high thrust; because we cannot use another strike, which we easily can trick and hit the attacking enemy who would be surprised, and would not consider the mistake that could come from being on the said two imagined guards. But the original low guard is the most effective, so therefore there are no more than three guards as stated.
+
| These said two guards created by the said low is often done for drawing some ignorant strikes who makes either a high right-hand or high thrust; because we cannot use another strike, which we easily can trick and hit the attacking enemy who would be surprised, and would not consider the mistake that could come from being on the said two imagined guards. But the original low guard is the most effective, so therefore there are no more than three guards as stated.
  
 
| Cesdites deux gardes engendrées de ladite basse, elle se font bien souvent pour attirer quelque coup des ignorans, qui fera un maindroict, ou un estoc haut ; car autre coup on ne peut, sur lesquels facilement on peut attraper & toucher l’ennemy assaillant qui sera estourdy, & ne considerera l’accident qui peut venir, estant sur sesdittes deux gardes faintes. Mais la garde basse leur mere est la plus certaine, de sorte qu’il n’y a que trois gardes, comme dit est.
 
| Cesdites deux gardes engendrées de ladite basse, elle se font bien souvent pour attirer quelque coup des ignorans, qui fera un maindroict, ou un estoc haut ; car autre coup on ne peut, sur lesquels facilement on peut attraper & toucher l’ennemy assaillant qui sera estourdy, & ne considerera l’accident qui peut venir, estant sur sesdittes deux gardes faintes. Mais la garde basse leur mere est la plus certaine, de sorte qu’il n’y a que trois gardes, comme dit est.
Line 238: Line 238:
  
 
* Right-Hand,
 
* Right-Hand,
* Backhand,
+
* Reversal,
 
* Thrust.
 
* Thrust.
  
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|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| It is true that they can be multiplied in six clean targets on the human body, which must be kept well, as well as a good tennis player must keep the es<ref>Dupuis describes this as a wooden board placed in the back wall of the tennis court which, if hit by a volley, is scored immediately. In modern tennis, this board is replaced by a grid.</ref> well so that the ball of the opposing party does not touch it. So too must a good fencer be careful that one of the three strikes do not hit the six targets that can be adapted as stated, which will be seen later.
+
| It is true that they can be multiplied in six distinct targets on the human body, which must be kept well, as well as a good tennis player must keep the es<ref>Dupuis describes this as a wooden board placed in the back wall of the tennis court which, if hit by a volley, is scored immediately. In modern tennis, this board is replaced by a grid.</ref> well so that the ball of the opposing party does not touch it. So too must a good fencer be careful that one of the three strikes do not hit the six targets that can be adapted as stated, which will be seen later.
  
 
| Bien est vray qu’ils se peuvent multiplier en six lieux propres sur corps humain, qui faut bien garder, tout ainsi qu’un bon joueur de paulme faut qu’il garde bien l’es,<ref>« L'es », habituellement orthographiée « ais », désigne une planche de bois placée dans le mur du fond de la salle de jeu de paume qui, si elle est touchée par un coup de volée, donne le point immédiatement. Dans le jeu de paume moderne, cette planche est remplacée par une grille. Il est possible que cet « ais » ait donné le terme anglais d'« ace » que les étymologies modernes confondent avec l'« as » du jeu de carte. Voir la définition d' « ais » de l'Encyclopédie de Diderot et d'Alembert.</ref> que lesteu<ref>L’esteuf : ancien nom pour la balle.</ref> de partie adverse ne le touche. Aussi faut il qu’un bon tireur d’armes garde bien qu’un desdits trois coups ne touchent aux six lieux ausquels se peuvent adapter comme dit est, dont se verront cy apres.
 
| Bien est vray qu’ils se peuvent multiplier en six lieux propres sur corps humain, qui faut bien garder, tout ainsi qu’un bon joueur de paulme faut qu’il garde bien l’es,<ref>« L'es », habituellement orthographiée « ais », désigne une planche de bois placée dans le mur du fond de la salle de jeu de paume qui, si elle est touchée par un coup de volée, donne le point immédiatement. Dans le jeu de paume moderne, cette planche est remplacée par une grille. Il est possible que cet « ais » ait donné le terme anglais d'« ace » que les étymologies modernes confondent avec l'« as » du jeu de carte. Voir la définition d' « ais » de l'Encyclopédie de Diderot et d'Alembert.</ref> que lesteu<ref>L’esteuf : ancien nom pour la balle.</ref> de partie adverse ne le touche. Aussi faut il qu’un bon tireur d’armes garde bien qu’un desdits trois coups ne touchent aux six lieux ausquels se peuvent adapter comme dit est, dont se verront cy apres.
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|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The fourth point is that attacking and defending can offend with no more than three said strikes: it is true that they can be multiplied and adapted as have been promised above at six clean targets on a person, either in attacking or in defending, and whoever knows the means to defend and offend with the said three strikes at the same time when multiplied can know a hundred strikes, which is above and will be defined later.
+
| The fourth point is that attacking and defending can offend with no more than three said strikes: it is true that they can be multiplied and adapted as have been promised above at six distinct targets on a person, either in attacking or in defending, and whoever knows the means to defend and offend with the said three strikes at the same time when multiplied can know a hundred strikes, which is above and will be defined later.
 
   
 
   
 
| Le quatriesme poinct est, que l’assaillant & deffendant ne se peuvent offencer que desdicts trois coups : bien est vray qu’ils se peuvent multiplier, & adapter comme avons promis si dessus en six lieux propres sur la person ne, soit en assaillant, ou en deffendant, & qui scaura le moyen de soy deffendre, & offencer à un mesme temps, comme ce peult, desdicts trois coups, qui sont cy dessus & seront si aprés definis, estant multipliez il en scaura cent.
 
| Le quatriesme poinct est, que l’assaillant & deffendant ne se peuvent offencer que desdicts trois coups : bien est vray qu’ils se peuvent multiplier, & adapter comme avons promis si dessus en six lieux propres sur la person ne, soit en assaillant, ou en deffendant, & qui scaura le moyen de soy deffendre, & offencer à un mesme temps, comme ce peult, desdicts trois coups, qui sont cy dessus & seront si aprés definis, estant multipliez il en scaura cent.
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|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The following are the names of the said six clean targets where one can and must throw the said three strikes which are:
+
| The following are the names of the said six distinct targets where one can and must throw the said three strikes which are:
  
 
* Right-Hand
 
* Right-Hand
* Backhand
+
* Reversal
 
* Thrust.
 
* Thrust.
  
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|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The second strike and target is a low backhand to the right leg of the defender if he is right; and if he left, it will be done at his left leg.
+
| The second strike and target is a low reversal to the right leg of the defender if he is right; and if he left, it will be done at his left leg.
  
 
| Le second coup & lieu, est un renvers, de bas au jarret droict du deffendeur, s’il est droictié, & s’il est gauché, se fera au jarret gauche.
 
| Le second coup & lieu, est un renvers, de bas au jarret droict du deffendeur, s’il est droictié, & s’il est gauché, se fera au jarret gauche.
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|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The fourth target is a high backhand at the right shoulders of the defendant, multiplied once.
+
| The fourth target is a high reversal at the right shoulders of the defendant, multiplied once.
  
 
| Le quatriesme lieu est un renvers d’hault sur l’espaulle droicte du deffendant, estans multiplié une fois.
 
| Le quatriesme lieu est un renvers d’hault sur l’espaulle droicte du deffendant, estans multiplié une fois.
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|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The sixth and final target, is the right nipple of the said Prevost to which the Lieutenant throws a thrust, which is the said third strike, being multiplied once like the right-hand and the backhand.
+
| The sixth and final target, is the right nipple of the said Prevost to which the Lieutenant throws a thrust, which is the said third strike, being multiplied once like the said Right-Hand and the Reversal.
  
 
| Le sixiesme & dernier lieu, est le tetin droict dudict Prevost auquel le Lieutenent tirera un estoc, qui est ledict troisiesme coup, estant multiplié une fois comme ledict Maindroict, & Renvers.
 
| Le sixiesme & dernier lieu, est le tetin droict dudict Prevost auquel le Lieutenent tirera un estoc, qui est ledict troisiesme coup, estant multiplié une fois comme ledict Maindroict, & Renvers.
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| ''The following is the declaration and reason why the said Author removes the said Fendente against the opinion of the said Fabrice and Jules and many others, who nevertheless always put them in the list of the said strikes.''
 
| ''The following is the declaration and reason why the said Author removes the said Fendente against the opinion of the said Fabrice and Jules and many others, who nevertheless always put them in the list of the said strikes.''
  
The reason why I first removed the said Fedante is because it cannot actually be done. Because any Fendente that is true must hold and must not leave the top and middle of the thing you want to slash. I know of no man, as long as I have practiced in all the sciences or arts, that having a sword in hand, cutlass, or another weapons that can properly slash with whatever strikes that he can do, will not participate either on one side or the other, which gives up the middle. And yet if such a strike is thrown in the right side, is not Fedente but is Right-Hand, and if kept on the left side, it is not Fendente but will be Backhand.
+
The reason why I first removed the said Fedante is because it cannot actually be done. Because any Fendente that is true must hold and must not leave the top and middle of the thing you want to slash. I know of no man, as long as I have practiced in all the sciences or arts, that having a sword in hand, cutlass, or another weapons that can properly slash with whatever strikes that he can do, will not participate either on one side or the other, which gives up the middle. And yet if such a strike is thrown in the right side, is not Fedente but is Right-Hand, and if kept on the left side, it is not Fendente but will be a Reversal.
  
 
| ''S’ensuit la declaration & raison cy aprés pourquoy ledit Autheur oste ledit Fendant, contre l’opinion desdits Fabrice & Julle, & plusieurs autres, ce neantmoins de tout temps les ont mis & mettent au ranc desdits coups.''
 
| ''S’ensuit la declaration & raison cy aprés pourquoy ledit Autheur oste ledit Fendant, contre l’opinion desdits Fabrice & Julle, & plusieurs autres, ce neantmoins de tout temps les ont mis & mettent au ranc desdits coups.''
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Painstaking centuries and days sought therein  
 
Painstaking centuries and days sought therein  
 
The treasure of science so hidden from men.  
 
The treasure of science so hidden from men.  
 
+
O, my King the greatest who reigns under the poles
 +
I know not which aspects of malevolent signs,
 +
I know not neither misfortune nor disastrous star,
 +
Influences the Gauls this unfortunate fate
 +
And renders so the spirits of the past in your France
 +
Made drowsy and shrouded from foolish ignorance,
 +
That few we found who are affected by them
 +
A desire even more disdainfully abhorrent,
 +
An ignorant commoner with a bit of skillful advice,
 +
Boldly can undertake something higher,
 +
And worthy of his name, but since Francis,
 +
Your generous grandfather, the first father of the arts
 +
Of arms and art, and Henry your father
 +
The valiantly magnanimous and your brother Francis.
 +
And you my Lord and King whose illustrious grandeur
 +
Creates and promises France so much success
 +
And so too your brothers, these Princes born in greatness
 
</poem>
 
</poem>
  
Line 755: Line 771:
 
| The following is how one must be planted to put the sword in hand, both in time of peace and in times of war, with the steps, guards, drawings, and placements required in this art, which is truly necessary to those who wish to practice the said fencing.
 
| The following is how one must be planted to put the sword in hand, both in time of peace and in times of war, with the steps, guards, drawings, and placements required in this art, which is truly necessary to those who wish to practice the said fencing.
  
Four footprints are placed below the feet of the Lieutenant and Prevost which are marked number 1, and another 2, and another 3, and another 4, which serves the Lieutenant and Prevost and everyone else to teach how one must skillfully make all the steps, drawings, guards, and placement of the weapons well as imagined in this rectangle. <br>
+
Four footprints are placed below the feet of the Lieutenant and Prevost which are marked number 1, and another 2, and another 3, and another 4, which serves the Lieutenant and Prevost and everyone else to teach how one must skillfully make all the steps, drawings, guards, and placement of the weapons effectively as imagined in this rectangle. <br>
 
1      2 <br>
 
1      2 <br>
 
4      3
 
4      3
Line 802: Line 818:
 
''This is the end of the first drawing for the said Lieutenant.''
 
''This is the end of the first drawing for the said Lieutenant.''
  
''Following is the second drawing for the said Lieutenant.''
+
''The following is the second drawing for the said Lieutenant.''
  
 
For the second drawing for the Lieutenant, he must have the feet together like so as shown above at the first portraiture marked number 1. And to execute this said second drawing, he must move the right foot a little apart in the air, remove it from the footprint marked 2, carrying the sword hilt, drawing it higher than the shoulder, and the placement of this as above content 1. And in an instant pass the sword above the head, extending strongly the arms, keeping the sword hilt higher than the right shoulder, and placing the sword point at the left nipple of the Prevost, as shown in the said portraiture at number 3.
 
For the second drawing for the Lieutenant, he must have the feet together like so as shown above at the first portraiture marked number 1. And to execute this said second drawing, he must move the right foot a little apart in the air, remove it from the footprint marked 2, carrying the sword hilt, drawing it higher than the shoulder, and the placement of this as above content 1. And in an instant pass the sword above the head, extending strongly the arms, keeping the sword hilt higher than the right shoulder, and placing the sword point at the left nipple of the Prevost, as shown in the said portraiture at number 3.
Line 810: Line 826:
 
''This is the declaration for the first and second drawings for the said Prevost, which is to know how to put the sword in hand as taught by the said Lieutenant.''
 
''This is the declaration for the first and second drawings for the said Prevost, which is to know how to put the sword in hand as taught by the said Lieutenant.''
  
And to do this, the said Prevost has to remember how he placed his said first plan as shown above in number 2, which is with the feet together, and from there the said Prevost must make the said first drawing by pulling the right foot on footprint 2 back to the footprint marked number 3, which is also the first step, and at the same time put the sword in hand, carrying the sword hilt higher and a bit farther than the right shoulder, placing the sword point straight at the left eye to be on high guard, and keeping the left hand right of the left nipple to deflect the sword point of the said Lieutenant if by fortune he wants to advance further, as shown above in the portraiture marked number 4.
+
And to do this the said Prevost must remember how he has was placed above at the said first plan marked number 2, which is with the feet together, and from there the said Prevost must make the said first drawing by pulling the right foot on footprint 2 back to the footprint marked number 3, which is also the first step, and at the same time put the sword in hand, carrying the sword hilt higher and a bit farther than the right shoulder, placing the sword point straight at the left eye to be on high guard, and keeping the left hand right of the left nipple to deflect the sword point of the said Lieutenant if by fortune he wants to advance further, as shown above in the portraiture marked number 4.
  
 
''This is the end of the first drawing of the said Prevost.''
 
''This is the end of the first drawing of the said Prevost.''
Line 943: Line 959:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 13-14.png|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 13-14.png|400x400px|center]]
| ''This guard is almost similar to the one before, barely being different, and yet it will serve as another one in order to make and execute said first strike of the sword alone for the Lieutenent and Prevost.''
+
| ''This guard is almost similar to the one before, hardly different yet it will serve as another one to make and execute the said first strike of the sword alone for the Lieutenent and Prevost.''
  
 
In order to declare this guard for the Lieutenant, he must have his feet together to pull the right foot<ref>Dupuis states the original says left but is incompatible with the rest of the text and the engraving.</ref> back a little apart, carrying the sword hilt higher than the right shoulder, placing the sword point straight at the throat; the guard of the Lieutenant above marked in number 11 is the same, but the placement isn't because he places the point at the left nipple, whereas this one states it is at the throat, keeping the left hand under the arm of the sword, as shown below at the portraiture marked on number 13.
 
In order to declare this guard for the Lieutenant, he must have his feet together to pull the right foot<ref>Dupuis states the original says left but is incompatible with the rest of the text and the engraving.</ref> back a little apart, carrying the sword hilt higher than the right shoulder, placing the sword point straight at the throat; the guard of the Lieutenant above marked in number 11 is the same, but the placement isn't because he places the point at the left nipple, whereas this one states it is at the throat, keeping the left hand under the arm of the sword, as shown below at the portraiture marked on number 13.
Line 968: Line 984:
 
| ''The following is the first strike of the sword alone for the attacking Lieutenant against the defending Prevost.''
 
| ''The following is the first strike of the sword alone for the attacking Lieutenant against the defending Prevost.''
  
And to do this, this next said Lieutenant must have taken the step and one of the said drawings, staying on the left foot as the portraiture above marked number 13, and in order to do and execute this first strike of the sword alone, the said Lieutenant will advance the right foot, being on the said guard marked 13, and will throw a low right-hand at the left knee of the Prevost, raising the sword hilt almost as high as the left shoulder, lowering well the sword point down to do this said right-hand at the leg more perfectly, keeping the left hand as shown above at the portraiture of the said Lieutenant marked number 15.
+
And to do this, this said Lieutenant must have taken the step and one of the said drawings, staying on the left foot as the portraiture above marked number 13, and in order to execute this first strike of the sword alone, the said Lieutenant will advance the right foot, being on the said guard marked 13, and will throw a low right-hand at the left knee of the Prevost, raising the sword hilt almost as high as the left shoulder, lowering well the sword point down to do this said right-hand at the leg more perfectly, and keeping the left hand as shown above at the portraiture of the said Lieutenant marked number 15.
  
 
''This is the end of the first strike of the sword alone for the attacking Lieutenant against the defending Prevost.''
 
''This is the end of the first strike of the sword alone for the attacking Lieutenant against the defending Prevost.''
Line 974: Line 990:
 
''Next is to declare how the Prevost will have defended his knee and will have thrown a right-hand at the arms of the Lieutenant.''
 
''Next is to declare how the Prevost will have defended his knee and will have thrown a right-hand at the arms of the Lieutenant.''
  
And to do this, the said Prevost is on his left leg, having made one of the three drawings, guards, and placement, and stays on the said guard marked number 14 above, the said Prevost to properly execute, defend, and offend at the same time this said low right-hand, pulls his left foot back and throws a right-hand at the sword arm of the said Lieutenant, and unlike other ignorant demonstrators who crosses sword against sword when a strike comes from below, which is fine because by that he defends himself; but this strike is better because he defends himself and offends thereby doing two good things, I recommend that you take the better one, as the said Prevost also does in executing this said strike, keeping the left hand as shown at the portraiture marked number 16.  
+
And to do this, the said Prevost being on his left leg, having made one of the three drawings, guards, and placement, and staying on the said guard marked number 14 above, the said Prevost to properly execute, defend, and offend at the same time this said low right-hand, pulls his left foot back and throws a right-hand at the sword arm of the said Lieutenant, and unlike other ignorant demonstrators who crosses sword against sword when a strike comes from below, which is fine because by that he defends himself; but this strike is better because he defends himself and offends thereby doing two good things, I recommend that you take the better one, as the said Prevost also does in executing this said strike, keeping the left hand as shown at the portraiture marked number 16.  
  
 
''This is the defense of the said low right-hand at the knee defended by the Prevost against the said Lieutenant.''
 
''This is the defense of the said low right-hand at the knee defended by the Prevost against the said Lieutenant.''
Line 994: Line 1,010:
 
| ''The following is the first counter and continuation of the first strike, which is for the attacking Lieutenant and for the defending Prevost.''
 
| ''The following is the first counter and continuation of the first strike, which is for the attacking Lieutenant and for the defending Prevost.''
  
And to do this, the Lieutenant being again on the right foot, having thrown the said low right-hand at the knee, while the Prevost threw a right-hand at the sword arm at the same time, as shown above at the said Lieutenant on number 15 and the Prevost on 16. The said Lieutenant being again on the right foot, seeing himself about to be struck by a right-hand on the sword arm, immediately lifts and carries his sword high and throws a back-hand<ref>per Dupuis's transcription, it's literally "backhand" as opposed to the technique before named "renver" for whatever reason Didier thought to use a different word this time. I've included a hyphen to differentiate but I think it's supposed to be the same.</ref> on the side of the right shoulder of the Prevost, keeping the said Lieutenant's fingernails of the right hand to face left, and his left hand is keeping right of his face, as shown above at the portraiture, marked behind the collar in number 17.
+
And to do this, the Lieutenant being again on the right foot, having thrown the said low right-hand at the knee, while the Prevost threw a right-hand at the sword arm at the same time as shown above at the said Lieutenant on number 15 and the Prevost on 16. The said Lieutenant being again on the right foot, seeing himself about to be struck by a right-hand on the sword arm, immediately lifts and carries his sword high and throws a back-hand on the side of the right shoulder of the Prevost, keeping the said Lieutenant's fingernails of the right hand to face left, and his left hand is keeping right of his face, as shown above at the portraiture marked behind the collar in number 17.
  
 
''The end of the first counter of the first strike of the sword alone for the said Lieutenant.''
 
''The end of the first counter of the first strike of the sword alone for the said Lieutenant.''
Line 1,000: Line 1,016:
 
''Next will be declared the defense of the first counter and continuation for the Prevost against the said Lieutenant.''
 
''Next will be declared the defense of the first counter and continuation for the Prevost against the said Lieutenant.''
  
And to evade and to guard himself against this first continuation, which is a high back-hand, having thrown a right-hand at the arms of the said Lieutenant, as shown above at the portraiture of the said Lieutenant marked number 15 and at the Prevost who executed the right-hand, marked number 16, the said Prevost being on the right foot to guard and to defend this said first counter, will cross the sword of the said Lieutenant with the strong on the weak, presenting him a thrust to the face of the said Lieutenant, keeping the said Prevost's left hand near his left nipple, as shown above at the portraiture marked number 18.
+
And to evade and to guard himself against this first continuation, which is a high back-hand, having thrown a right-hand at the arms of the said Lieutenant, as shown above at the portraiture of the said Lieutenant marked number 15 and at the Prevost who executed the right-hand marked number 16, the said Prevost being on the right foot to guard and to defend this said first counter, will cross the sword of the said Lieutenant with the strong on weak, presenting a thrust to the face of the said Lieutenant, keeping the said Prevost's left hand near his left nipple, as shown above at the portraiture marked number 18.
  
''The end of the first counter and continuation for the said Prevost, being well defended by this against the said Lieutenant.''
+
''The end of the first counter and continuation for the said Prevost against the said Lieutenant, being effectively defended by this.''
  
 
| ''Sensuit la premiere opposite & suitte, du premier coup, qui est pour le Lieutenent assaillant, & pour le Prevost deffendant.''
 
| ''Sensuit la premiere opposite & suitte, du premier coup, qui est pour le Lieutenent assaillant, & pour le Prevost deffendant.''
Line 1,020: Line 1,036:
 
| ''The following is the second counter and continuation for the Lieutenant and the Prevost of the first strike of the sword alone, which is a right-hand.''
 
| ''The following is the second counter and continuation for the Lieutenant and the Prevost of the first strike of the sword alone, which is a right-hand.''
  
And to complete this second continuation by the said Lieutenant, he must be still on this right foot, and having made the said second counter and continuation, having seen the said Prevost defending himself, the said Lieutenant again for this second continuation steals away<ref>In modern fencing, dérobement is a fencing term for disengage.</ref> his sword below the sword hilt of the Prevost, and throws a high right-hand at the said Prevost, keeping the back of the sword hand down and the nails up, and the left hand right of his face, as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 19.
+
And to complete this second continuation by the said Lieutenant, he must still be on the right foot and having made the said second counter and continuation, having seen the said Prevost defending himself, the said Lieutenant again for this second continuation steals away<ref>In modern fencing, dérobement is a fencing term for disengage.</ref> his sword below the sword hilt of the Prevost and throws a high right-hand at the said Prevost, keeping the back of the sword hand down and the nails up, and the left hand right of his face, as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 19.
  
 
''The end of the second continuation of the said first strike for the Lieutenant.''
 
''The end of the second continuation of the said first strike for the Lieutenant.''
Line 1,026: Line 1,042:
 
''Next will show how the Prevost must defend himself of the said second counter and continuation thrown by the attacking Lieutenant.''
 
''Next will show how the Prevost must defend himself of the said second counter and continuation thrown by the attacking Lieutenant.''
  
And to guard himself effectively, the said Prevost must watch the sword point of the said Lieutenant, and when he steals away below the sword hilt of the said Prevost to throw the high right-hand at him, the said Prevost not removing the step of the right foot, will cross the said right-hand that is thrown at him by the said Lieutenant with the strong on weak and will present a thrust to the face of the said Lieutenant, keeping the left hand right on his shoulder, as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 20.
+
And to guard himself effectively, the said Prevost must watch the sword point of the said Lieutenant, and when he steals away below the sword hilt of the said Prevost to throw the high right-hand at him, the said Prevost not removing the step of the right foot, will cross the said right-hand that is thrown at him by the said Lieutenant with the strong on weak and will present a thrust to the face of the said Lieutenant, keeping the left hand right upon his shoulder, as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 20.
  
 
''This is the end of the second counter and continuation of the said first strike for the Prevost.''
 
''This is the end of the second counter and continuation of the said first strike for the Prevost.''
Line 1,044: Line 1,060:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 21-22.png|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 21-22.png|400x400px|center]]
| ''The two following portraitures show the guard and position for doing the second strike for the Lieutenant and the Prevost in this section of the sword alone.''
+
| ''The following two portraitures show the guard and position to make the second strike for the Lieutenant and the Prevost in this section of the sword alone.''
  
To do this said guard for the Lieutenant effectively he must have his feet together as shown above in the general position of the said Lieutenant marked number 9, which is to demonstrate how one must make all of the guards which is required for the said fencing. And to do this guard for the said Lieutenant, being thus placed as stated, he needs to pull his right foot back a little apart under the right side and at the same time put the sword in hand, carrying the sword hilt a little higher than the right shoulder which is the high guard, placing the sword point straight at the eyes, keeping the left hand under the left thigh, as marked at the portraiture number 21.
+
To do this said guard for the Lieutenant effectively he must have his feet together as shown above in the general position of the said Lieutenant marked number 9, which is to demonstrate how one must make all of the guards which is required for the said fencing. And to do this guard for the said Lieutenant, being thus placed as stated, he needs to pull his right foot back a little apart under the right side and at the same time put the sword in hand, carrying the sword hilt a little higher than the right shoulder which is the high guard, placing the sword point straight at the eyes, keeping the left hand above the left thigh, as marked at the portraiture number 21.
  
 
''The end of the guard for the Lieutenant.''
 
''The end of the guard for the Lieutenant.''
  
''The following is the writing for the guard and position for the said Prevost.
+
''The following is the writing of the guard and position for the said Prevost.''
  
And to do this the Prevost likewise is to have the feet together, as shown above at the portraiture marked number 10, and in order to make the low guard effectively the said Prevost needs to pull the right foot back in drawing to carry the sword hilt under his left lap, placing the sword point straight at the braies of the said Lieutenant, and also keeping the left hand right of the left nipple, as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 22 behind the bonnet.
+
And to do this the Prevost likewise is to have the feet together, as shown above at the portraiture marked number 10, and in order to make the low guard effectively the said Prevost needs to pull the right foot back in drawing to carry the sword hilt above his left lap, placing the sword point straight at the braies of the said Lieutenant, and also keeping the left hand right of the left nipple, as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 22 behind the bonnet.
  
 
''The end of the said guard and position for the said Prevost.''
 
''The end of the said guard and position for the said Prevost.''
Line 1,070: Line 1,086:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 23-24.png|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 23-24.png|400x400px|center]]
| ''The follwing is the second strike of the sword alone on this next section, which is a low backhand  at the right knee of the Prevost, thrown by the Lieutenant and properly defended by the Prevost.''
+
| ''The following is the second strike of the sword alone on this section, which is a low reversal at the right knee of the Prevost, thrown by the Lieutenant and properly defended by the Prevost.''
  
And to do this, the Lieutenant remaining on the right foot having made and thrown the said first and second counters, is to execute and make the said second strike by advancing with the left foot and throwing a back-hand at the right knee of the Prevost, keeping the left hand straight at the face, as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked 23.   
+
And to do this, the Lieutenant remaining on the right foot having made and thrown the said first and second counters, is to execute and make the said second strike by advancing with the left foot and throwing a back-hand at the right knee of the Prevost, keeping the left hand right of his face, as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked 23.   
  
 
''This is the end of the said second strike for the Lieutenant.''
 
''This is the end of the said second strike for the Lieutenant.''
  
The said Lieutenant pretends to not know the remedy of the said backhand, but he does it as will be seen afterwards: because he does not want to defend himself, not making the remedy, waiting for him to show the said Prevost how he has to do it.
+
The said Lieutenant pretends to not know the remedy of the said reversal, but he does it as will be seen afterwards; because he does not want to defend himself, therefore not making the remedy, waiting for him to show the said Prevost how he has to do it.
  
''Here will be declared the second strike of the sword alone for the said Prevost, which is a backhand on the sword elbow of the Lieutenant.''
+
''Here will be declared the second strike of the sword alone for the said Prevost, which is a reversal on the sword elbow of the Lieutenant.''
  
And to do this, having made the first guard and drawing while being under the left foot, in order to execute this strike when the said Lieutenant advanced his left foot to throw a low back-hand at the Prevost's knee, the said Prevost pulls back his right foot and throws a backhand at the elbow of the sword arm of the said Lieutenant instead of going for the sword as done by the ignorants, keeping the left hand under the left lap, as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 24 behind the collar.
+
And to do this, having made the first guard and drawing while being under the left foot, in order to execute this strike when the said Lieutenant advanced his left foot to throw a low back-hand at the Prevost's knee, the said Prevost pulls back his right foot and throws a reversal at the elbow of the sword arm of the said Lieutenant instead of going for the sword as done by the ignorant, keeping the left hand above the left lap, as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 24 behind the collar.
  
''The end of the second strike which is a backhand under the elbow of the sword arm of the said Lieutenant, thrown by the said Prevost.''
+
''The end of the second strike which is a reversal under the elbow of the sword arm of the said Lieutenant, thrown by the said Prevost.''
  
 
| ''Sensuit le second coup de ceste espée seule, suivant l’ordre d’icelle, qui est un renvers de bas au jarret droict du Prevost, tiré par le Lieutenent, & deffendu proprement par le Prevost.''
 
| ''Sensuit le second coup de ceste espée seule, suivant l’ordre d’icelle, qui est un renvers de bas au jarret droict du Prevost, tiré par le Lieutenent, & deffendu proprement par le Prevost.''
Line 1,101: Line 1,117:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 25-26.png|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 25-26.png|400x400px|center]]
| ''The following is the counter and continuation and declarations of the second strike, which is a low backhand at the left knee of the Prevost thrown by the Lieutenant.''
+
| ''The following is the counter and continuation and declarations of the second strike, which is a low reversal at the left knee of the Prevost thrown by the Lieutenant.''
  
And to do this the said Lieutenant remains on the left foot, seeing himself to be struck on the elbow of the sword arm as stated at the other said figures marked 23 and 24, immediately this Lieutenant is to make his first counter or continuation and pulls up his right hand for a high thrust, as he should do, keeping the sword hilt with the fingertips facing left and keeping the left hand right on his shoulder, as shown above at the portraiture marked number 25.
+
And to do this the said Lieutenant remains on the left foot, seeing himself about to be struck on the elbow of the sword arm as stated at the other said figures marked 23 and 24, immediately this Lieutenant is to make his first counter or continuation and pulls up his right hand for a high thrust, as he should do, keeping the sword hilt with the fingertips facing left and keeping the left hand right of his shoulder, as shown above at the portraiture marked number 25.
  
 
''This is the end of the first counter of the said strike for the Lieutenant.''
 
''This is the end of the first counter of the said strike for the Lieutenant.''
  
Here will be shown the declaration of the first counter or continuation of the said second strike, which is a low backhand at the knee of the said Lieutenant and a backhand at the elbow, thrown by the said Prevost marked number 23 and 24 above for the said Lieutenant and for the said Prevost. And to defend himself from the second counter or continuation, which is a right-hand or high thrust thrown by the said Lieutenant, it is necessary that the said Prevost being on the step of the left foot, crosses the sword of the said Lieutenant with the strong on the weak, and presents him a thrust to the face of the said Lieutenant, keeping the fingernails on the hand of the sword hilt up and the left hand under the elbow of the sword arm, as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 26.
+
Here will be shown the declaration of the first counter or continuation of the said second strike, which is a low reversal at the knee of the said Lieutenant and a reversal at the elbow, thrown by the said Prevost marked number 23 and 24 above for the said Lieutenant and for the said Prevost. And to defend himself from the second counter or continuation, which is a right-hand or high thrust thrown by the said Lieutenant, it is necessary that the said Prevost being on the step of the left foot, crosses the sword of the said Lieutenant with the strong on the weak, and presents him a thrust to the face of the said Lieutenant, keeping the fingernails on the hand of the sword hilt up and the left hand under the elbow of the sword arm, as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 26.
  
 
''This is the end of the first counter of the said second strike for the said Prevost.''
 
''This is the end of the first counter of the said second strike for the said Prevost.''
Line 1,125: Line 1,141:
 
| ''Declaration of the second counter of the said second strike for the Lieutenant and the Prevost.''
 
| ''Declaration of the second counter of the said second strike for the Lieutenant and the Prevost.''
  
And to do this, the Lieutenant needs to be under the said step of the right foot to steal away his sword under the sword hilt of the Prevost, and to throw again a high backhand or high thrust for the second counter and continuation at his choice on the right side, keeping the nails on sword hilt facing left, and the left hand straight at his face, as shown above at the portraiture marked number 27.
+
And to do this, the Lieutenant needs to be under the said step of the right foot to steal away his sword under the sword hilt of the Prevost, and to throw again either a high reversal or high thrust for the second counter and continuation of his choice on the right side, keeping the nails on sword hilt facing left, and the left hand straight at his face, as shown above at the portraiture marked number 27.
  
 
''The end of the second counter for this Lieutenant on the second strike.''
 
''The end of the second counter for this Lieutenant on the second strike.''
  
''Declaratoion of the second counter for the defending Prevost against the said Lieutenant.''
+
''Declaration of the second counter for the defending Prevost against the said Lieutenant.''
  
And to do this the said Prevost needs to also be under the right foot and that he crosses and strikes down with the strong on the weak of the sword of the said attacking Lieutenant, which is the second continuation, keeping the sword hilt and fingertips down, and presenting a thust to his left nipple, also keeing the left hand right of the left nipple, as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 28.
+
And to do this the said Prevost needs to also be under the right foot and that he crosses and strikes down with the strong on the weak of the sword of the said attacking Lieutenant, which is the second continuation, keeping the sword hilt and fingertips down, and presenting a thust to his left nipple, and also keeping the left hand right of the left nipple, as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 28.
  
''This is the end of the second counter for the Prevost starting with low backhand at the knee of the Lieutenant, then defended and cut at the arms by the Prevost, as shown at length with the portraitures above the strikes.''
+
''This is the end of the second counter for the Prevost starting with low reversal at the knee of the Lieutenant, then defended and cut at the arms by the Prevost, as shown at length with the portraitures above the strikes.''
  
 
And if some Lieutenants or Prevosts are left-handed, they must observe the same step, guard, and placement, if they want to be good and perfect to demonstrate the said fencing.
 
And if some Lieutenants or Prevosts are left-handed, they must observe the same step, guard, and placement, if they want to be good and perfect to demonstrate the said fencing.
Line 1,155: Line 1,171:
 
| ''The following guard and position of the third strike, which is a high right-hand for the attacking Lieutenant against the defending Prevost.''
 
| ''The following guard and position of the third strike, which is a high right-hand for the attacking Lieutenant against the defending Prevost.''
  
And to do this the said Lieutenant needs to have done the said steps and drawings, and having remained on the left foot in low guard, keeping the sword hand and the edge down and the point placing a bit above the braies of the Prevost, keeping also this said Lieutenant's left hand right of his chin, as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 29 behind the hat.
+
And to do this the said Lieutenant needs to have done the said steps and drawings, and having remained on the left foot in low guard, keeping the sword hand and the cutting edge down and the point placing a bit above the braies of the Prevost, keeping also this said Lieutenant's left hand right of his chin, as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 29 behind the hat.
  
 
''End of the guard and position for the said Lieutenant.''
 
''End of the guard and position for the said Lieutenant.''
Line 1,179: Line 1,195:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 31-32.png|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 31-32.png|400x400px|center]]
| ''The third strike of the sword alone for the Lieutenant and the Prevost is a high right-hand that follows the section of the said clean targets.''
+
| ''The third strike of the sword alone for the Lieutenant and the Prevost is a high right-hand that follows the section of the said distinct targets.''
  
And to do this, the said attacking Lieutenant who is demonstrating this must, as have been said in many places, be as stated on the step of the left foot, as marked above at the portraiture of the said Lieutenant, not this one but the other marked number 29. And to do this said third strike, which is a high right-hand on the left shoulder of the said Prevost, the said Lieutenant must advance the right foot and throw a right-hand at the left shoulder of the said defending Prevost, keeping the sword hand up<ref>The position of the hand illustrates the fingers down, in opposition to the text.</ref>, and his left hand right of the chin as shown above at the portraiture marked number 31.
+
And to do this, the said attacking Lieutenant demonstrating this must, as have been stated many times, be on the step of the left foot as marked above at the portraiture of the said Lieutenant, not this one but the other marked number 29. And to do this said third strike, which is a high right-hand at the left shoulder of the said Prevost, the said Lieutenant must advance the right foot and throw a right-hand at the left shoulder of the said defending Prevost, keeping the sword hand up<ref>The position of the hand illustrates the fingers down, in opposition to the text.</ref>, and his left hand right of the chin as shown above at the portraiture marked number 31.
  
 
''Next is the declaration and defense of the said third strike which is a high right-hand thrown by the said attacker and defended by the said Prevost.''
 
''Next is the declaration and defense of the said third strike which is a high right-hand thrown by the said attacker and defended by the said Prevost.''
  
And to do this the said Prevost needs to be on the step of the left foot, having done one of the said three drawings in high guard, as shown in the figure of the said defending Prevost marked number 30. And to do execute and defend well against the high right-hand of the third strike, the Prevost, following the section of the true teachings of the sword alone, must pull the left foot back, cross the sword of the said attacking Lieutenant with strong on weak, that is to say from the hilt near the middle of the sword of the said Lieutenant, keeping the hand on the sword, the nails high, placing and throwing a thrust straight at the chin of the said Lieutenant, and keeping the left hand right of the nipple as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked 32.
+
And to do this the said Prevost needs to be on the step of the left foot, having made one of the said three drawings in high guard, as shown in the figure of the said defending Prevost marked number 30. And to effectively execute and defend against the high right-hand of the third strike, the Prevost following the section of the true teachings of the sword alone, must pull the left foot back, cross the sword of the said attacking Lieutenant with strong on weak, that is to say from the hilt to near the middle of the sword of the said Lieutenant, keeping the nails of the sword hand up, throwing a thrust straight at the chin of the said Lieutenant, and keeping the left hand right of the nipple as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked 32.
  
 
''The end of the said third strike fro the said Prevost.''
 
''The end of the said third strike fro the said Prevost.''
Line 1,203: Line 1,219:
 
| ''The following is the first counter and continuation for the Lieutenant and the Prevost, for the said third strike of the sword alone.''
 
| ''The following is the first counter and continuation for the Lieutenant and the Prevost, for the said third strike of the sword alone.''
  
To do this first counter and continuation for the said third strike well, which is a high right-hand the said Lieutenant must be under the right foot having thrown the said right-hand against the Prevost, as shown in the figure and portraiture number 31 above. And in an instant in order to execute and make the first counter and continuation well the said Lieutenant must steal away his sword in passing a back-hand below the sword hilt of the Prevost, and throw a backhand or a back-hand high at the left shoulder of the Prevost, as shown above in the figure of the said Lieutenant, marked number 33.
+
To do this first counter and continuation for the said third strike effectively, which is a high right-hand the said Lieutenant must be under the right foot having thrown the said right-hand against the Prevost, as shown in the figure and portraiture number 31 above. And in an instant in order to execute and make the first counter and continuation effectively the said Lieutenant must steal away his sword in passing a back-hand below the sword hilt of the Prevost, and throw a high reversal or high back-hand at the left shoulder of the Prevost, as shown above in the figure of the said Lieutenant, marked number 33.
  
 
''The end of the counter and continuation of the third strike for the Lieutenant.''
 
''The end of the counter and continuation of the third strike for the Lieutenant.''
Line 1,209: Line 1,225:
 
''The following is the defense of the first counter and continuation of the said third strike for the Prevost against the said Lieutenant.''
 
''The following is the defense of the first counter and continuation of the said third strike for the Prevost against the said Lieutenant.''
  
And to do this, this said Prevost must be on the right foot. And when the said Lieutenant steals away and passes his sword underneath the Prevost to throw a back-hand at his right side of the sword, the Prevost holding firm on the right foot to defend this continuation will cross his sword on the sword of the said attacking Lieutenant, strong on weak, as defined above many places at the other counters and continuations, keeping the nails on the hand keeping the sword down, presenting a thrust at the stomach of the said Lieutenant, and also keeping his left hand right of his nipple, as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 34.
+
And to do this, this said Prevost must be on the right foot. And when the said Lieutenant steals away and passes his sword underneath the Prevost to throw a back-hand at his right side of the sword, the Prevost holding firm on the right foot to defend this continuation will cross his sword on the sword of the said attacking Lieutenant, strong on weak, as defined above many times at the other counters and continuations, keeping the nails on the sword hand down, presenting a thrust at the stomach of the said Lieutenant, and also keeping his left hand right of his nipple, as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 34.
  
 
''The end of the first counter of the said third strike for the Prevost.''
 
''The end of the first counter of the said third strike for the Prevost.''
Line 1,229: Line 1,245:
 
| ''The second counter and continuation of the said third strike for the Lieutenant and the Prevost.''
 
| ''The second counter and continuation of the said third strike for the Lieutenant and the Prevost.''
  
And to do this second counter and continuation well of the said third strike for the said Lieutenant, the Lieutenant must be with on the right foot and with the sword of the Lieutenant having backhanded, with the step of the same right foot, he will pass and steal away his sword below the sword hilt of the Prevost and throw the second counter and continuation with a fore-hand on the left shoulder of the Prevost, keeping the nails on the sword hand facing left and the left hand on the face, as shown above at the portraiture marked number 35.
+
And to effectively do the second counter and continuation of the said third strike for the said Lieutenant, the Lieutenant must be on the right foot and with the sword of the Lieutenant having reversaled, with the step of the same right foot, he will pass and steal away his sword below the sword hilt of the Prevost and throw the second counter and continuation with a fore-hand<re>read: right-hand</ref> on the left shoulder of the Prevost, keeping the nails on the sword hand facing left and the left hand right of the face, as shown above at the portraiture marked number 35.
  
 
''The end of the second counter and continuation of the said third strike for the said Lieutenant.''
 
''The end of the second counter and continuation of the said third strike for the said Lieutenant.''
Line 1,235: Line 1,251:
 
''Next will show and declare the second and last counter and continuation of the said third strike for the Prevost.''
 
''Next will show and declare the second and last counter and continuation of the said third strike for the Prevost.''
  
And to do this, the said Prevost must step as mentioned above, which is on the right foot, and to defend himself from that said counter or continuation, the said Prevost must cross the sword of the said attacking Lieutenant near the hilt, a bit higher than the middle of the sword of the said Lieutenant with strong on weak, keeping the sword hilt and the nails on its hand up, presenting a thrust to the face of the said Lieutenant, and also keeping the said Prevost's left hand right on his nipple as shown above at the said portraiture marked number 36 behind his back.
+
And to do this, the said Prevost must step as mentioned above, which is on the right foot, and to defend himself from that said counter or continuation, the said Prevost must cross the sword of the said attacking Lieutenant near the hilt to a bit higher than the middle of the sword of the said Lieutenant with strong on weak, keeping the sword hilt and the nails holding it up, presenting a thrust to the face of the said Lieutenant, and also keeping the said Prevost's left hand right of his nipple as shown above at the said portraiture marked number 36 behind his back.
  
 
''This is the end of the second and last counter of the said third strike, which is a high right-hand for the said Lieutenant marked 35, and defended by the said Prevost marked 36.
 
''This is the end of the second and last counter of the said third strike, which is a high right-hand for the said Lieutenant marked 35, and defended by the said Prevost marked 36.
Line 1,253: Line 1,269:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 37-38.png|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 37-38.png|400x400px|center]]
| ''The following is the declaration, guard, and positioning of the fourth cut, which is a high backhand next on this section of the said sword alone for the Lieutenant and Prevost, and everything that must be done.''
+
| ''The following is the declaration, guard, and positioning of the fourth cut, which is a high reversal on this section of the said sword alone for the Lieutenant and Prevost, and everything that must be done.''
  
 
And to do this, the Lieutenant must have the feet together to first make one of the said two drawings as stated, and here is where the said Lieutenant places his right foot, which demonstrates the difference from where the left foot is placed, and the said Lieutenant keeps the sword hilt upon the right lap in low guard placing the sword point straight at the lap of the Prevost, keeping the left hand opposite of his chin, as shown above at the portraiture and figure of the said Lieutenant, marked in number 37.
 
And to do this, the Lieutenant must have the feet together to first make one of the said two drawings as stated, and here is where the said Lieutenant places his right foot, which demonstrates the difference from where the left foot is placed, and the said Lieutenant keeps the sword hilt upon the right lap in low guard placing the sword point straight at the lap of the Prevost, keeping the left hand opposite of his chin, as shown above at the portraiture and figure of the said Lieutenant, marked in number 37.
Line 1,259: Line 1,275:
 
''This is the end of the position and guard for the attacking Lieutenant, which is to begin to throw the fourth strike.''
 
''This is the end of the position and guard for the attacking Lieutenant, which is to begin to throw the fourth strike.''
  
Following also the reasoning of the portraiture and positioning for the said defending Prevost, who after having made one of the said three drawings the said Prevost also remains on the step of the right foot in middle guard, keeping the sword hilt straight higher than the right shoulder, placing the sword point at the left nipple of the said Lieutenant, and keeping the left hand right of his stomach, as shown above at the portraiture marked in number 38.
+
The following is also the reason of the portraiture and the position for the said defending Prevost, who after having made one of the said three drawings the said Prevost has also remained on the step of the right foot in middle guard, keeping the sword hilt straight and higher than the right shoulder, placing the sword point at the left nipple of the said Lieutenant, and keeping the left hand right of his stomach, as shown above at the portraiture marked in number 38.
  
 
''This is the end of the guard for the said Lieutenant for throwing the fourth strike against the Prevost.''
 
''This is the end of the guard for the said Lieutenant for throwing the fourth strike against the Prevost.''
Line 1,275: Line 1,291:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 39-40.png|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 39-40.png|400x400px|center]]
| ''This will show and declare the fourth strike of the sword alone, which is a high backhand, multiplied for the attacking Lieutenant against the defending Prevost.''
+
| ''This will show and declare the fourth strike of the sword alone, which is a high reversal, multiplied for the attacking Lieutenant against the defending Prevost.''
  
And to execute it, the said Lieutenant must be on the right foot, advances the left foot, and throws a backhand on the right shoulder of the Prevost, pretending to throw a thrust to his face, keeping the left hand right of his chin, as shown above at the portraiture marked number 39.
+
And to execute it, the said Lieutenant must be on the right foot, advances the left foot, and throws a reversal on the right shoulder of the Prevost, pretending to throw a thrust to his face, keeping the left hand right of his chin, as shown above at the portraiture marked number 39.
  
 
''This is the end of the fourth strike for the Lieutenant.''
 
''This is the end of the fourth strike for the Lieutenant.''
  
Next is the defense of the said fourth strike for the defending Prevost, which is a high backhand thrown by the said agressive Lieutenant. And to do this, the said Prevost is to be on the right foot in middle guard, as shown above at the portraiture and figure number 38, and he must pull his right foot back and cross his sword at the sword of the said Lieutenant, strong on weak, on the said backhand, which is the fourth strike thrown by the said Lieutenant, keeping the nails on the sword hand down and therefore the back of the hand up, and presents a thrust at the said Lieutenant, also keeping the left hand right on his shoulder, as shown above at the portraituremarked number 40 behind the collar.
+
Next is the defense of the said fourth strike for the defending Prevost, which is a high reversal thrown by the said agressive Lieutenant. And to do this, the said Prevost is to be on the right foot in middle guard, as shown above at the portraiture and figure number 38, and he must pull his right foot back and cross his sword at the sword of the said Lieutenant, strong on weak, on the said reversal, which is the fourth strike thrown by the said Lieutenant, keeping the nails on the sword hand down and therefore the back of the hand up, and presents a thrust at the said Lieutenant, also keeping the left hand right on his shoulder, as shown above at the portraiture marked number 40 behind the collar.
  
 
''This is the end of the said fourth strike for the defending Prevost.''
 
''This is the end of the said fourth strike for the defending Prevost.''
Line 1,300: Line 1,316:
 
| ''The following is the first counter and continuation of the said fourth strike for the attacking Lieutenent against the defending Prevost.''
 
| ''The following is the first counter and continuation of the said fourth strike for the attacking Lieutenent against the defending Prevost.''
  
And to do this, this Lieutenant must remain on the step of the left foot and at the same instance that he throws the said high backhand, he steal away his sword below the Prevost's and throws a high right-hand at the said Prevost as the first counter, being as stated on the left foot, keeping the nails on the sword hand up and the left hand right of his chest, as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 40.
+
And to do this, this Lieutenant must remain on the step of the left foot and at the same instance that he throws the said high reversal, he steal away his sword below the Prevost's and throws a high right-hand at the said Prevost as the first counter, being as stated on the left foot, keeping the nails on the sword hand up and the left hand right of his chest, as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 40.
  
 
''The end of the first counter for the demonstrating Lieutenant.''
 
''The end of the first counter for the demonstrating Lieutenant.''
Line 1,306: Line 1,322:
 
''This is the defense of the first counter of the fourth strike for the Prevost against the said Lieutenant.''
 
''This is the defense of the first counter of the fourth strike for the Prevost against the said Lieutenant.''
  
And to do this, this said Prevost must be on the step of the left foot and when the said Lieutenant throws a high right-hand at him, in order to counter the Prevost needs to cross and beat down at the same time, and without a moment to waste, be the strong on weak, turning the fingernails on the sword hilt up to present a thrust at the throat or the eyes of the said Lieutenant, keeping the left hand right of his nipple as shown above at the portraiture marked number 42.
+
And to do this, this said Prevost must be on the step of the left foot and when the said Lieutenant throws a high right-hand at him, in order to counter the Prevost needs to cross and beat down at the same time, and without a moment to waste, be strong on weak, turning the fingernails on the sword hilt up to present a thrust at the throat or the eyes of the said Lieutenant, keeping the left hand right of his nipple as shown above at the portraiture marked number 42.
  
 
''This is the defense of the first counter, derived from the said fourth strike for the said Prevost.''
 
''This is the defense of the first counter, derived from the said fourth strike for the said Prevost.''
Line 1,324: Line 1,340:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 43-44.png|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 43-44.png|400x400px|center]]
| ''The following is the second and last counter for the said fourth strike, which is a high backhand, and will also begin on the left foot for this attacking Lieutenant and defended by this Prevost.''
+
| ''The following is the second and last counter for the said fourth strike, which is a high reversal, and will also begin on the left foot for this attacking Lieutenant and defended by this Prevost.''
  
And to do this this Lieutenant in order to execute the second counter well must, without leaving where he's currently planted which is on the left foot, steal away the sword below the Prevost's and throw a high backhand, which is the proper strike, keeping the sword hand high and the left hand right of the chin, as shown above at the said portraiture and figure marked number 43 behind the bonnet.
+
And to do this, this Lieutenant in order to execute the second counter effectively must, without leaving where he's currently planted which is on the left foot, steal away the sword below the Prevost's and throw a high reversal, which is the proper strike, keeping the sword hand up and the left hand right of the chin, as shown above at the said portraiture and figure marked number 43 behind the bonnet.
  
 
''After having declared the second counter by the said attacking Lieutenant, stay to perform and declare the second counter for the defending Prevost.''
 
''After having declared the second counter by the said attacking Lieutenant, stay to perform and declare the second counter for the defending Prevost.''
  
And to do this, the Prevost must be on the left foot and at the same time without a moment to waste after having thrown and defended the said first counter and continuation, he then returns to the cross and beat down the second counter which is the high backhand of the said Lieutenant, and also must be strong on weak, keeping the nails of the sword hand down, and presenting a thrust at his neck, keeping the left hand below the sword arm as shown next to this writing at the said portraiture and figure marked number 44.
+
And to do this, the Prevost must be on the left foot, and at the same time without a moment to waste after having thrown and defended the said first counter and continuation, return to cross and beat down the second counter which is the high reversal of the said Lieutenant, and also must be strong on weak, keeping the nails of the sword hand down, and presenting a thrust to his neck, keeping the left hand below the sword arm as shown next to this writing at the said portraiture and figure marked number 44.
  
 
''This is the end of the defense of the second counter of the said fourth strike for the Prevost.''
 
''This is the end of the defense of the second counter of the said fourth strike for the Prevost.''
Line 1,348: Line 1,364:
 
| ''The following is the position and guard for the attacking Lieutenant and for the defending Prevost to execute and throw a high thrust which is the fifth strike.''
 
| ''The following is the position and guard for the attacking Lieutenant and for the defending Prevost to execute and throw a high thrust which is the fifth strike.''
  
And to do this the Lieutenant is to have the feet together as stated in the said first plan, which is necessary for doing the first low guard well, he then pulls the right foot back while drawing the sword, and to carry the guard on the left lap, the sharp edge down, placing the point straight more or less at the braies, also keeping the left hand right of the nipples as shown above at this portraiture of the said Lieutenant marked number 45 behind the top of the collar.
+
And to do this the Lieutenant is to have the feet together as stated in the said first plan, which is necessary for doing the first low guard effectively, he then pulls the right foot back while drawing the sword, to carry the hilt right of the left lap, cutting edge down, placing the point straight more or less at the braies, and also keeping the left hand right of the nipples as shown above at this portraiture of the said Lieutenant marked number 45 behind the top of the collar.
  
 
''This is the end of the guard and position to make the said fifth strike for the sword alone, following the section for the Lieutenant.''
 
''This is the end of the guard and position to make the said fifth strike for the sword alone, following the section for the Lieutenant.''
Line 1,354: Line 1,370:
 
''Next is declared the guard and position for this said Prevost to defend himself from the said fifth strike which is the thrust thrown by the Lieutenant.''
 
''Next is declared the guard and position for this said Prevost to defend himself from the said fifth strike which is the thrust thrown by the Lieutenant.''
  
And to di this, the said Prevost is to also have the feet together to do this said guard and position, he then must pull his right foot back and do one of the three drawings, and to carry the sword hilt a bit higher than the right shoulder to be in high guard, keeping the back of the sword hand up, placing the sword point at the mouth of the said Lieutenant, also keeping the left hand right of the chest as shown and can be seen above at the said portraiture marked number 46.
+
And to do this the said Prevost is to also have the feet together to do this said guard and position, he then must pull his right foot back and do one of the three drawings and carry the sword hilt a bit higher than the right shoulder to be in high guard, keeping the back of the sword hand up, placing the sword point at the mouth of the said Lieutenant, and also keeping the left hand right of the chest as shown and can be seen above at the said portraiture marked number 46.
  
 
''This is the end of the position and guard for this said Prevost to defend and guard himself from the said thrust, the fifth strike, thrown by the said attacking Lieutenant.''
 
''This is the end of the position and guard for this said Prevost to defend and guard himself from the said thrust, the fifth strike, thrown by the said attacking Lieutenant.''
Line 1,372: Line 1,388:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 47-48.png|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 47-48.png|400x400px|center]]
| ''The following is the fifth strike which is a high thrust with the right-hand, this subsequent section of the sword alone for the attacking Lieutenant against the defending Prevost.''
+
| ''The following is the fifth strike which is a high thrust with the right-hand, following the section of the sword alone for the attacking Lieutenant against the defending Prevost.''
  
And to do this, this Lieutenant must be on the left foot as shown above at the other portraiture marked 45, then advances the right foot and throws a thrust at the nipples of the Prevost, turning the nails sword hilt up and the left hand right of his face as apparently shown by this writing for the said portraiture, marked number 47 behind the back of the head.
+
And to do this, this Lieutenant must be on the left foot as shown above at the other portraiture marked 45, then advances the right foot and throws a thrust at the nipples of the Prevost, turning the nails and sword hilt up and the left hand right of his face as apparently shown by this writing for the said portraiture, marked number 47 behind the back of the head.
  
 
''This is the fifth strike fo the sword alone, thrown by the said attacking Lieutenant.''
 
''This is the fifth strike fo the sword alone, thrown by the said attacking Lieutenant.''
Line 1,380: Line 1,396:
 
''The following is the defense for the said fifth strike, which is a high thrust, made from a high right-hand by the defending Prevost against the said attacking Lieutenant.''
 
''The following is the defense for the said fifth strike, which is a high thrust, made from a high right-hand by the defending Prevost against the said attacking Lieutenant.''
  
And to do this, the said Prevost must be on the right foot, then pulls the left foot back, beats down and crosses the sword of the said Lieutenant with his own, strong on weak, which is to say to be near the middle guard, with the sword point a bit higher, the nails up, presenting a thrust at the said Lieutenant straight at his face, keeping the left hand of the said Prevost right of his left nipple, as shown by the portraiture and figure marked number 48 above. And if the said Prevost is left-handed and the said right-handed Lieutenant shoots a thrust at him, he must advance the right forward, and cross the sword of the said Lieutenant, strong on weak as can be seen  by the example and exercise against a left-hander. It is true that if the Prevost is left-handed, the said Lieutenant or whoever must adapt to the left-handed Prevost to teach him, that is to say that he needs to be left-handed and make the first step be with the feet together and pulls the left foot on the footprint marked at the first portraitures 4, and leaves the footprint marked 1, strange as it seems and in its place.
+
And to do this, the said Prevost must be on the right foot, then pulls the left foot back, beats down and crosses the sword of the said Lieutenant with his own, strong on weak, which is to say to be near the middle guard, with the sword point a bit higher, the nails up, presenting a thrust to the said Lieutenant straight to his face, and keeping the left hand of the said Prevost right of his left nipple, as shown by the portraiture and figure marked number 48 above. And if the said Prevost is left-handed and the said right-handed Lieutenant shoots a thrust at him, he must advance the right forward, and cross the sword of the said Lieutenant, strong on weak as can be seen  by the example and exercise against a left-hander. It is true that if the Prevost is left-handed, the said Lieutenant or whoever must adapt to the left-handed Prevost to teach him, that is to say that he needs to be left-handed and make the first step be with the feet together and pulls the left foot on the footprint marked at the first portraitures 4, and leaves the footprint marked 1, strange as it seems.
  
 
''The end and declaration of the said fifth strike for the said Lieutenant and the Prevost when one or the other is left-handed.
 
''The end and declaration of the said fifth strike for the said Lieutenant and the Prevost when one or the other is left-handed.
Line 1,398: Line 1,414:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 49-50.png|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 49-50.png|400x400px|center]]
| ''The following is the first counter and continuation of the said fifth strike which is the high thrust thrown by the attacking Lieutenant against the defending Prevost here.''
+
| ''The following is the first counter and continuation of the said fifth strike which is the high thrust thrown by the attacking Lieutenant against the defending Prevost.''
  
And to do this, the said Lieutenant must be on the step of the right foot to do this counter and continuation a little after he has thrown the said thrust, the fifth strike with the right-hand, the said Lieutenant steals away his sword below the sword hilt of the Prevost that he throws at this Lieutenant, for the first counter and continuation another on the backhand, which is on the right side of the Prevost, keeping the left hand right of the nipple as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 49. And if the said Lieutenant is left-handed, he must throw the strike at the opposite of what is described, holding the opposite step of the said counter and continuation, that is to say that if the said Lieutenant throws a right-handed backhand, the Prevost if left-handed would have to beat it down with a right-hand<ref>The technique.</ref> using his left hand.
+
And to do this, the said Lieutenant must be on the step of the right foot to do this counter and continuation a little after he has thrown the said thrust, the fifth strike with the right-hand, the said Lieutenant steals away his sword below the sword hilt of the Prevost that he throws at this Lieutenant, for the first counter and continuation another on the reversal, which is on the right side of the Prevost, keeping the left hand right of the nipple as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 49. And if the said Lieutenant is left-handed, he must throw the strike at the opposite of what is described, holding the opposite step of the said counter and continuation, that is to say that if the said Lieutenant throws a right-handed reversal, the Prevost if left-handed would have to beat it down with a right-hand<ref>The technique.</ref> using his left hand.
  
 
''The end of the counter for the said Lieutenant.''
 
''The end of the counter for the said Lieutenant.''
Line 1,406: Line 1,422:
 
''Next will be declared the defense of the first counter and continuation of the said fifth strike for the said Prevost against the agressive Lieutenant.''
 
''Next will be declared the defense of the first counter and continuation of the said fifth strike for the said Prevost against the agressive Lieutenant.''
  
And to do this, the said Prevost is to also be on the right foot while the said Lieutenant steals away his sword to throw at him the first counter which is a high thrust on the right. The said Prevost seeing this, being on his right foot crosses his sword on that of the said Lieutenant with strong on weak, keeping the back of the sword hand up and presenting a thrust to his neck, keeping the left hand right of his left nipple as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 50.
+
And to do this, the said Prevost is to also be on the right foot while the said Lieutenant steals away his sword to throw the first counter at him which is a high thrust on the right. The said Prevost seeing this, being on his right foot crosses his sword on that of the said Lieutenant with strong on weak, keeping the back of the sword hand up and presenting a thrust to his neck, keeping the left hand right of his left nipple as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 50.
  
 
''This is the end of the said counter for the said Prevost.''
 
''This is the end of the said counter for the said Prevost.''
Line 1,426: Line 1,442:
 
| ''The following is the second counter and continuation of the said fifth strike fo the sword alone, which is a high thrust for the attacking Lieutenant and for the defending Prevost.''
 
| ''The following is the second counter and continuation of the said fifth strike fo the sword alone, which is a high thrust for the attacking Lieutenant and for the defending Prevost.''
  
In order to declare and understand the said second counter and continuation for this Lieutenant well, he must be on the step of the right foot, as he has been when he threw the said fifth strike, the high thrust, passing his sword to steal away on the back-hand below the sword hilt of the Prevost, and in an instant the said Lieutenant for the second continuation throws again his choice of a high thrust or high right-hand on the left side of the defending Prevost, keeping the back of the sword hand down, the nails up, and the keeping left hand right of the nipple as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 51.
+
In order to declare and understand the said second counter and continuation for this Lieutenant effectively, he must be on the step of the right foot, as he had been when he threw the said fifth strike, the high thrust, passing his sword to steal away the back-hand below the sword hilt of the Prevost, and in an instant the said Lieutenant for the second continuation throws again his choice of a high thrust or high right-hand at the left side of the defending Prevost, keeping the back of the sword hand down, the nails up, and the keeping left hand right of the nipple as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 51.
  
 
''The end of the second counter for the said Lieutenant.''
 
''The end of the second counter for the said Lieutenant.''
Line 1,432: Line 1,448:
 
''Next is declared the protection and defense of the second counter of the said fifth strike, which is to guard this said Prevost further against the said Lieutenant.''
 
''Next is declared the protection and defense of the second counter of the said fifth strike, which is to guard this said Prevost further against the said Lieutenant.''
  
And to do this, the said Prevost needs to be on the step of the right foot, cross and beat down the sword of the said attacking Lieutenant, strong on weak, on the right-hand otherwise called the fore-hand, and by this means will defend and ward the said Prevost from the said second counter and continuation, thrown by the said Lieutenant, and when all is done the said Prevost will present a thrust at the face of the said Lieutenant, keeping the sword hilt and the nails on the hand holding it up, and the left hand right of the left nipple, as shown above at this portraiture marked number 52 behind his hat.
+
And to do this, the said Prevost needs to be on the step of the right foot, cross and beat down the sword of the said attacking Lieutenant, strong on weak, on the right-hand otherwise called the fore-hand, and by this means will defend and ward the said Prevost from the said second counter and continuation, thrown by the said Lieutenant, and when all is done the said Prevost will present a thrust to the face of the said Lieutenant, keeping the sword hilt and the nails on the hand holding it up, and the left hand right of the left nipple, as shown above at this portraiture marked number 52 behind his hat.
  
 
''The end of the second counter and continuation of the said fifth strike, which is a high thrust with the right-hand, defended by the said Prevost against the said demonstrating Lieutenant.''
 
''The end of the second counter and continuation of the said fifth strike, which is a high thrust with the right-hand, defended by the said Prevost against the said demonstrating Lieutenant.''
Line 1,451: Line 1,467:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 53-54.png|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 53-54.png|400x400px|center]]
| ''This is the guard and position of the Lieutenant and the Prevost for the sixth strike the thrust, multiplied at the sixth clean target on the defender.''
+
| ''This is the guard and position of the Lieutenant and the Prevost for the sixth strike the thrust, multiplied at the sixth distinct target on the defender.''
  
One must declare this next guard and position to make and execute the thrust, which is the sixth and last strike and target, being as stated multiplied in several strikes and counters of the sword alone above. And this is multiplied on the right side. One could begin to pull the left foot but will have to multiply the strikes, or execute them with a feint. But to begin this said guard by the said Lieutenant the said sixth strike, he will hold himself on the right foot in middle guard, keeping the back of the sword hand up, placing the sword point straight at the eyes of the Prevost, and the keeping left hand right of the chin, as shown at the portraiture marked number 53 behind the collar.
+
One must declare this next guard and position to make and execute the thrust, which is the sixth and last strike and target, being as stated multiplied in several strikes and counters of the sword alone above. And this is multiplied on the right side. One could begin to pull the left foot but will have to multiply the strikes, or execute them with a feint. But to begin this said guard by the said Lieutenant the said sixth strike, he will keep himself on the right foot in middle guard, keeping the back of the sword hand up, placing the sword point straight at the eyes of the Prevost, and the keeping the left hand right of the chin, as shown at the portraiture marked number 53 behind the collar.
  
One must note for left-handers to defend this said high thrust well, it is necessary that he holds on the left foot and crosses the sword with strong on weak for defense, as will be seen after the subsequent strike.
+
One must note for left-handers to defend this said high thrust effectively, it is necessary that he keeps the left foot and crosses the sword with strong on weak for defense, as will be seen after the subsequent strike.
  
 
''The end and declaration fo the position and guard by the said Lieutenant.''
 
''The end and declaration fo the position and guard by the said Lieutenant.''
Line 1,461: Line 1,477:
 
''The following is the declaration of the guard and position for the said Prevost, to prepare to defend from the said high thrust, which will be thrown after by the Lieutenant against the Prevost, the sixth and last strike being mulitplied as stated at the sixth target.''
 
''The following is the declaration of the guard and position for the said Prevost, to prepare to defend from the said high thrust, which will be thrown after by the Lieutenant against the Prevost, the sixth and last strike being mulitplied as stated at the sixth target.''
  
This said guard and position for the Prevost is, which must be on the right foot like the said Lieutenant, how much one can keep on the left foot, and advance the right foot, but at the last strike and target being mulitplied, we will perform the guard which is being done on the right foot. To do this, the said Prevost will be on the right foot in low guard, keeping the nails on the sword hand down, placing the sword point straight at the stomach of the said Lieutenant, and keeping his left hand right of the nipple, as we can see above at the portraiture and figure marked number 54 near the plume of the bonnet.
+
This said guard and position for the Prevost, which must be on the right foot like the said Lieutenant, is how one can keep on the left foot and advance the right foot, but at the last strike and target being multiplied, we will perform the guard which is being done on the right foot. To do this, the said Prevost will be on the right foot in low guard, keeping the nails on the sword hand down, placing the sword point straight at the stomach of the said Lieutenant, and keeping his left hand right of the nipple, as we can see above at the portraiture and figure marked number 54 near the plume of the bonnet.
  
One must note that all the left-handed who follow the instrucion that I put, both for the Lieutenant and also the Prevost must make the opposite step, and similarly the drawings, and the strikes are also the opposite of right-handers, and those who strive to follow these said reasons will improve. Because experience will make them improve.
+
One must note that all the left-handed who follow the instrucion that I put, both for the Lieutenant and also the Prevost must make the opposite step, and similarly the drawings and the strikes are also the opposite of right-handers, and those who strive to follow these said reasons will improve. Because experience will make them improve.
  
''This is the end of the said position and guard for the Prevost, to defend himself from the sixth strike, which will be next by the demonstrating Lieutenant.''
+
''This is the end of the said position and guard for the Prevost to defend himself from the sixth strike, which had been thrown by the demonstrating Lieutenant.''
  
 
| ''Voicy la garde & tenue du Lieutenent & Prevost pour l’estoc sixiesme coup, estant multiplié au sixiesme lieu propre sur le deffendeur.''
 
| ''Voicy la garde & tenue du Lieutenent & Prevost pour l’estoc sixiesme coup, estant multiplié au sixiesme lieu propre sur le deffendeur.''
Line 1,485: Line 1,501:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 55-56.png|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 55-56.png|400x400px|center]]
| ''The following is the sixth and last strike and target of the sword to be multiplied, which is a high thrust on the backhand thrown by the attacking Lieutenant against the defending Prevost.''
+
| ''The following is the sixth and last strike and target of the sword to be multiplied, which is a high thrust on the reversal thrown by the attacking Lieutenant against the defending Prevost.''
  
And to do this, this Lieutenant must be on the said guard and said step shown above at the portraiture marked number 53. This Lieutenant being on the right foot as stated will pretend to make a thrust at the left side of the Prevost on the said right foot, and in an instant will advance the left foot, stealing away his sword below the sword hilt of the Prevost, and throwing a thrust at his right, keeping the sword hilt and the fingertips on the hand holding it facing left, and keeping the left hand right on his left nipple, as shown above at the portraiture marked number 55 behind the collar of the said Lieutenant.
+
And to do this, this Lieutenant must be on the said guard and said step shown above at the portraiture marked number 53. This Lieutenant being on the right foot as stated will pretend to make a thrust at the left side of the Prevost on the said right foot, and in an instant will advance the left foot, stealing away his sword below the sword hilt of the Prevost, and throwing a thrust at his right, keeping the sword hilt and the fingertips on the hand holding it facing left, and keeping the left hand right of his left nipple, as shown above at the portraiture marked number 55 behind the collar of the said Lieutenant.
  
 
''The end and declaration of the said sixth and last strike of the sword alone for the attacking Lieutenant.''
 
''The end and declaration of the said sixth and last strike of the sword alone for the attacking Lieutenant.''
Line 1,493: Line 1,509:
 
''After having performed the sixth and last strike of the sword alone for the said attacking Lieutenant, also stay to perform the defense of it for the defending Prevost.''
 
''After having performed the sixth and last strike of the sword alone for the said attacking Lieutenant, also stay to perform the defense of it for the defending Prevost.''
  
And to do this, the said Prevost is to be on the right foot, as shown at the said portraiture being on his guard marked number 54, throwing it back and crossing his sword on the sword of the attacking Lieutenant, beating down and defending the said thrust with strong on weak, defining again strong on weak, which is that he must cross all strikes near the sword hilt at the middle of the sword of the enemy, and that is the strong on weak, and doing this the said Prevost will present a thrust at the chest of the said attacking Lieutenant, keeping the back of the sword hand up and the left hand below the sword elbow, as shown above at the portraiture marked 56.
+
And to do this, the said Prevost is to be on the right foot as shown at the said portraiture being on his guard marked number 54, pulling it back and crossing his sword on the sword of the attacking Lieutenant, beating down and defending the said thrust with strong on weak - defining again strong on weak which is that he must cross all strikes near the sword hilt at the middle of the sword of the enemy - and in doing this the said Prevost will present a thrust to the chest of the said attacking Lieutenant, keeping the back of the sword hand up and the left hand below the sword elbow, as shown above at the portraiture marked 56.
  
 
''The end and the declaration of the defense of the sixth and last strike for the said defending Prevost against the said attacking Lieutenant.''
 
''The end and the declaration of the defense of the sixth and last strike for the said defending Prevost against the said attacking Lieutenant.''
Line 1,513: Line 1,529:
 
| ''The following is the first counter and continuation of the said sixth and last strike being multiplied, which is a high thrust for the attacking Lieutenant and defended by the Prevost.
 
| ''The following is the first counter and continuation of the said sixth and last strike being multiplied, which is a high thrust for the attacking Lieutenant and defended by the Prevost.
  
''This is shown by the author Henry d S. Didier what the said Lieutenant must do to attack the Prevost well with the last strike and target of the said sword alone, following the art and order of this.''
+
''This is shown by the author Henry d S. Didier what the said Lieutenant must do to effectively attack the Prevost with the last strike and target of the said sword alone, following the art and order of this.''
  
And to do this, the said Lieutenant is to be on the left foot, having thrown the sixth strike as shown above at the portraiture marked number 55. His sword being on the back-hand and to make and execute the first counter well, this Lieutenant will steal away his sword below the sword hilt of the Prevost, and throws at him a thrust on the right-hand for the first counter, turning the nails on the sword hand up and the left hand right of his face, to protect against the sword point of the Prevost as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 57 behind the collar of the said Lieutenant.
+
And to do this, the said Lieutenant is to be on the left foot, having thrown the sixth strike as shown above at the portraiture marked number 55. His sword being on the back-hand and to execute the first counter effectively, this Lieutenant will steal away his sword below the sword hilt of the Prevost, and will throw at him a thrust on the right-hand for the first counter, turning the nails on the sword hand up and the left hand right of his face, to protect against the sword point of the Prevost as shown above at the portraiture and figure marked number 57 behind the collar of the said Lieutenant.
  
 
''The end of the first counter and continuation of the sixth strike and target for the said attacking Lieutenant.''
 
''The end of the first counter and continuation of the sixth strike and target for the said attacking Lieutenant.''
Line 1,521: Line 1,537:
 
''This is the defense of the first counter and continuation for the said Prevost of the said sixth strike, which is a high thrust being multiplied and thrown by the said attacking Lieutenant and defended by the Prevost, as will be seen by the writings after the said author directs and teaches, as it should be defended from the said thrust.''
 
''This is the defense of the first counter and continuation for the said Prevost of the said sixth strike, which is a high thrust being multiplied and thrown by the said attacking Lieutenant and defended by the Prevost, as will be seen by the writings after the said author directs and teaches, as it should be defended from the said thrust.''
  
And to do this, the said Prevost must remain firm and stable on the step of the left foot, and for the defense and conservation fo the said counter, which will be a thrust the Prevost will cross on his sword on the sword of the said Lieutenant with strong on weak coming from the side of a right-hand, carrying the nails on the sword hand up and presenting a thrust at the face of the said Lieutenant, keeping also the left hand of the said Prevost right of the left nipple, as shown above at the portraiture marked 58.
+
And to do this, the said Prevost must remain firm and stable on the step of the left foot, and for the defense and conservation of the said counter, which will be a thrust the Prevost will cross his sword on the sword of the said Lieutenant with strong on weak coming from the side of a right-hand, carrying the nails on the sword hand up and presenting a thrust to the face of the said Lieutenant, keeping also the left hand of the said Prevost right of the left nipple, as shown above at the portraiture marked 58.
  
 
''This is the end and defense of the first counter and continuation of the sixth and last strike for the said defending Prevost.''
 
''This is the end and defense of the first counter and continuation of the sixth and last strike for the said defending Prevost.''
Line 1,541: Line 1,557:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 59-60.png|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 59-60.png|400x400px|center]]
| ''This is the second and last counter and continuation of the said sixth strike being multiplied, which is a high thrust on the backhand, coming from the said thrust on the right-hand of the Lieutenant executed against the Prevost.''
+
| ''This is the second and last counter and continuation of the said sixth strike being multiplied, which is a high thrust on the reversal, coming from the said thrust on the right-hand of the Lieutenant executed against the Prevost.''
  
 
And to do this, this said Lieutenant must be on the left foot and his sword at the first counter, which is a right-hand or thrust, as shown at the portraiture marked 57. And to execute the second and last counter for the Lieutenant, he must steal away his sword below the sword hilt of the Prevost and throw another thrust on the said back-hand, keeping the back of the sword hand up, his left hand right of the face to defend against the sword point of the Prevost if in case he drives it more forward, as shown above at the portraiture marked number 59 behind the hat.
 
And to do this, this said Lieutenant must be on the left foot and his sword at the first counter, which is a right-hand or thrust, as shown at the portraiture marked 57. And to execute the second and last counter for the Lieutenant, he must steal away his sword below the sword hilt of the Prevost and throw another thrust on the said back-hand, keeping the back of the sword hand up, his left hand right of the face to defend against the sword point of the Prevost if in case he drives it more forward, as shown above at the portraiture marked number 59 behind the hat.
Line 1,547: Line 1,563:
 
''This is the end of the second and last counter and continuation for the attacking Lieutenant against the defending Prevost.''
 
''This is the end of the second and last counter and continuation for the attacking Lieutenant against the defending Prevost.''
  
''The defense of the second counter or continuation of the said sixth and last strike of the sword alone, which is a high thrust on the backhand for the defending Prevost against the said attacking Lieutenant.''
+
''The defense of the second counter or continuation of the said sixth and last strike of the sword alone, which is a high thrust on the reversal for the defending Prevost against the said attacking Lieutenant.''
  
And for the defense of this said counter and continuation for the said Prevost, he must be on the left foot, and he need to cross the sword of the said Lieutenant, strong on weak, which is near the hilt at the middle of the sword as stated above in several places, and present a thrust at the left nipple or at the eye of the said Lieutenant, having nails on the sword hand down, and the left hand right of his stomach which is below the elbow, holding the sword as shown in the portraiture marked number 60 behind the hat.
+
And for the defense of this said counter and continuation for the said Prevost, he must be on the left foot, and he need to cross the sword of the said Lieutenant, strong on weak, which is near the hilt at the middle of the sword as stated above several times, and present a thrust at the left nipple or at the eye of the said Lieutenant, having the nails on the sword hand down, and the left hand right of his stomach which is below the sword elbow, as shown in the portraiture marked number 60 behind the hat.
  
''This is the end of the six said strikes, being multiplied at the said clean targets, as stated above, with counters and continuations, both for the said attacking Lieutenant as well as for the defending Prevost.''
+
''This is the end of the six said strikes, being multiplied at the said distinct targets, as stated above, with counters and continuations, both for the said attacking Lieutenant as well as for the defending Prevost.''
  
 
| ''Icy est la seconde & derniere opposite & suitte, dudit sixiesme coup, estant multiplié, qui est un estoc d’hault,sur le renvers, venant dudit estoc sur le maindroit pour le Lieutenent, contre le Prevost, dont la voicy executée.''
 
| ''Icy est la seconde & derniere opposite & suitte, dudit sixiesme coup, estant multiplié, qui est un estoc d’hault,sur le renvers, venant dudit estoc sur le maindroit pour le Lieutenent, contre le Prevost, dont la voicy executée.''
Line 1,623: Line 1,639:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 65-66.png|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 65-66.png|400x400px|center]]
| ''And for the first counter and continuation of the said triangle for the attacking Lieutenant against the defending Prevost, the Lieutenant does a high thrust or high backhand.''
+
| ''And for the first counter and continuation of the said triangle for the attacking Lieutenant against the defending Prevost, the Lieutenant does a high thrust or high reversal.''
  
 
To do this counter and continuation well for the said Lieutenant, he must have his left foot on the footprint of the triangle marked number 1 in the portraiture, advance the right foot on the footprint marked number 3, and pass the sword point below the sword hilt of the Prevost, having made and thrown the said strike, and throw a high thrust on the right side of the Prevost for the first counter and continuation, keeping the nails on the sword hand down, and the left hand right of the nipple, as shown at the said portraiture marked number 65.
 
To do this counter and continuation well for the said Lieutenant, he must have his left foot on the footprint of the triangle marked number 1 in the portraiture, advance the right foot on the footprint marked number 3, and pass the sword point below the sword hilt of the Prevost, having made and thrown the said strike, and throw a high thrust on the right side of the Prevost for the first counter and continuation, keeping the nails on the sword hand down, and the left hand right of the nipple, as shown at the said portraiture marked number 65.
Line 1,631: Line 1,647:
 
''The following is the defense of the first counter and continuation for the said Prevost against the said Lieutenant.''
 
''The following is the defense of the first counter and continuation for the said Prevost against the said Lieutenant.''
  
And to do this the said Prevost must watch the point of the said Lieutenant for when it would pass below the sword hilt in order to throw either a high thrust or high backhand at the choice of the said Lieutenant, wait for the attack, and for the conservation of the first counter and continuation of the said triangle made by the Lieutenant, the said Prevost needs to cross the sword of the said Lieutenant, strong on weak, being on the right foot, and to present a thrust at the face of the said Lieutenant, keeping the back of the sword hand up, and the left hand right of the nipple, as shown above at the portraiture, marked number 66.
+
And to do this the said Prevost must watch the point of the said Lieutenant for when it would pass below the sword hilt in order to throw either a high thrust or high reversal at the choice of the said Lieutenant, wait for the attack, and for the conservation of the first counter and continuation of the said triangle made by the Lieutenant, the said Prevost needs to cross the sword of the said Lieutenant, strong on weak, being on the right foot, and to present a thrust at the face of the said Lieutenant, keeping the back of the sword hand up, and the left hand right of the nipple, as shown above at the portraiture, marked number 66.
  
 
''This is the end and defense of the first counter of the said triangle for the said Prevost.''
 
''This is the end and defense of the first counter of the said triangle for the said Prevost.''
Line 1,657: Line 1,673:
 
''The following is the reverse of the second counter and continuation for the said Prevost.''
 
''The following is the reverse of the second counter and continuation for the said Prevost.''
  
And to do this, the said Prevost must be on the left foot having made his step, as stated above at the said figures of the said three drawings, marked number 2 and 4, also as shown above at portraiture 62 of the said Prevost, and to guard the said strike thrown by the said Lieutenant well in the manner and fashion of the triangle, the said Prevost needs to watch the sword point of the said Lieutenant and never lose sight of it, and when the Lieutenant advances his right foot to throw a high thrust or high backhand, the said Prevost must cross these strikes, strong on weak, and present a thrust at the face, as shown above at the said portraiture marked number 64, and to make and execute the second counter for the said Prevost, he will be on the right foot and cross the thrust coming on the backhand thrown by the said Lieutenant, strong on weak, keeping the nails on the sword hand up, presenting a thrust at the face of the said Lieutenant, and keeping the left hand of the said Prevost right of the braies, as marked number 68 above.
+
And to do this, the said Prevost must be on the left foot having made his step, as stated above at the said figures of the said three drawings, marked number 2 and 4, also as shown above at portraiture 62 of the said Prevost, and to guard the said strike thrown by the said Lieutenant well in the manner and fashion of the triangle, the said Prevost needs to watch the sword point of the said Lieutenant and never lose sight of it, and when the Lieutenant advances his right foot to throw a high thrust or high reversal, the said Prevost must cross these strikes, strong on weak, and present a thrust at the face, as shown above at the said portraiture marked number 64, and to make and execute the second counter for the said Prevost, he will be on the right foot and cross the thrust coming on the reversal thrown by the said Lieutenant, strong on weak, keeping the nails on the sword hand up, presenting a thrust at the face of the said Lieutenant, and keeping the left hand of the said Prevost right of the braies, as marked number 68 above.
  
 
''This is the end and defense of the said strike for the said Prevost.''
 
''This is the end and defense of the said strike for the said Prevost.''
Line 1,755: Line 1,771:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 75-76.png|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 75-76.png|400x400px|center]]
| ''The following is the completion of the said rectangle which is a high right-hand or a high thrust thrown by the said Lieutenant against the Prevost.''
+
| ''The following is the completion of the said rectangle which is a high right-hand or high thrust thrown by the said Lieutenant against the Prevost.''
  
 
To complete the said rectangle for the said Lieutenant against the Prevost, the said Lieutenant must have the right foot on the footprint marked number 4 and the left foot on the footprint marked 3, stealing away his sword below the sword hilt of the Prevost and throwing a high right-hand or high thrust to complete the said rectangle, keeping the nails on the sword hand down and the left hand right of his face, as shown above at the portraiture marked number 75.
 
To complete the said rectangle for the said Lieutenant against the Prevost, the said Lieutenant must have the right foot on the footprint marked number 4 and the left foot on the footprint marked 3, stealing away his sword below the sword hilt of the Prevost and throwing a high right-hand or high thrust to complete the said rectangle, keeping the nails on the sword hand down and the left hand right of his face, as shown above at the portraiture marked number 75.
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''The following is the defense and completion of the said strike with two continuations in the fashion of a rectangle for the said defending Prevost against the attacking Lieutenant.''
 
''The following is the defense and completion of the said strike with two continuations in the fashion of a rectangle for the said defending Prevost against the attacking Lieutenant.''
  
And to do this, the said Prevost for the first continuation must be on the right foot, crossing and beating down the said high backhand or high thrust thrown by the said Lieutenant, strong on weak, keeping the nails on the sword hilt down, and throwing a high thrust at the left eye of the said Lieutenant as shown above at the other portraiture and figure marked number 74. And for the second counter and continuation which is to complete the said rectangle, the said Prevost must also be on the right foot and carefully watch the sword point of the said Lieutenant in every discourse of the said rectangle, and cross the sword of the said Lieutenant who is making the second counter which is a high right-hand or high thrust coming from the strong on weak, keeping the nails on the sword hand up and presenting a thrust to the said Lieutenant's face while keeping the left hand at his nipple as shown above at the portraiture marked number 76.
+
And to do this, the said Prevost for the first continuation must be on the right foot, crossing and beating down the said high reversal or high thrust thrown by the said Lieutenant, strong on weak, keeping the nails on the sword hilt down, and throwing a high thrust at the left eye of the said Lieutenant as shown above at the other portraiture and figure marked number 74. And for the second counter and continuation which is to complete the said rectangle, the said Prevost must also be on the right foot and carefully watch the sword point of the said Lieutenant in every discourse of the said rectangle, and cross the sword of the said Lieutenant who is making the second counter which is a high right-hand or high thrust coming from the strong on weak, keeping the nails on the sword hand up and presenting a thrust to the said Lieutenant's face while keeping the left hand at his nipple as shown above at the portraiture marked number 76.
  
 
''The end of the said rectangle for the said Prevost.''
 
''The end of the said rectangle for the said Prevost.''
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|-  
 
|-  
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 81-82.png|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 81-82.png|400x400px|center]]
| ''First strike thrown as a high right-hand or a high thrust for the first grab by the Lieutenant and nearly executed by the Prevost as shown here.''
+
| ''First strike thrown as a high right-hand or high thrust for the first grab by the Lieutenant and nearly executed by the Prevost as shown here.''
  
 
And to do this, the said Lieutenant needs to have made his said step, guard, and placement, being on the left foot, he must advance the right foot as shown at the figure and portraiture as stated in number 79. And also this said Lieutenant, being on the left foot advances his right foot and throws a high thrust or high right-hand at the Lieutenant<ref>It is meant to read as Prevost here.</ref>, keeping the nails of the sword hand up, and keeping also the left hand right of his stomach and below the sword arm, as shown at the portraiture marked number 81.
 
And to do this, the said Lieutenant needs to have made his said step, guard, and placement, being on the left foot, he must advance the right foot as shown at the figure and portraiture as stated in number 79. And also this said Lieutenant, being on the left foot advances his right foot and throws a high thrust or high right-hand at the Lieutenant<ref>It is meant to read as Prevost here.</ref>, keeping the nails of the sword hand up, and keeping also the left hand right of his stomach and below the sword arm, as shown at the portraiture marked number 81.
Line 1,991: Line 2,007:
 
''The following is what the said Prevost must do to make the second grab against the said Lieutenant.''
 
''The following is what the said Prevost must do to make the second grab against the said Lieutenant.''
  
And to do this, the said Prevost also will also be on the left foot in middle guard as shown above at the portraiture in number 90. The Lieutenant having thrown his choice of a high right-hand or a high thrust, the Prevost pulls the left foot back and crosses and beats down the sword of the Lieutenant, strong on weak, and seeing that he was tricked by the step and grab of the said Lieutenant, this said Prevost seeing the trickery, signals with his left hand that he wants to turn away and beat down the thrust at him, and can attack the said Lieutenant as shown above at the next said portraiture and figure marked number 92 behind his head.
+
And to do this, the said Prevost also will also be on the left foot in middle guard as shown above at the portraiture in number 90. The Lieutenant having thrown his choice of a high right-hand or high thrust, the Prevost pulls the left foot back and crosses and beats down the sword of the Lieutenant, strong on weak, and seeing that he was tricked by the step and grab of the said Lieutenant, this said Prevost seeing the trickery, signals with his left hand that he wants to turn away and beat down the thrust at him, and can attack the said Lieutenant as shown above at the next said portraiture and figure marked number 92 behind his head.
  
 
''The end of the second grab made by the said Lieutenant at the said Prevost and how he dealt with it.''
 
''The end of the second grab made by the said Lieutenant at the said Prevost and how he dealt with it.''
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| ''The second grab shown by the Author to the Lieutenant and executed by him against the Prevost, so that he can do this to another.''
 
| ''The second grab shown by the Author to the Lieutenant and executed by him against the Prevost, so that he can do this to another.''
  
And to do this, this said Lieutenant must have been on the right foot, advancing the left foot, and throwing a high right-hand or high thrust at the Prevost, stealing away with a backhand, passing the sword below the sword hilt of the Prevost, and at the same time, advancing the left foot and crossing the sword of the Prevost, strong on weak, and having taking his sword hilt with the left hand, hold it and pull so that he will be forced to leave it, seeing the point in front of him, and so will anyone else when we do the same to them as shown above at the portraiture marked number 93 behind the collar.
+
And to do this, this said Lieutenant must have been on the right foot, advancing the left foot, and throwing a high right-hand or high thrust at the Prevost, stealing away with a reversal, passing the sword below the sword hilt of the Prevost, and at the same time, advancing the left foot and crossing the sword of the Prevost, strong on weak, and having taking his sword hilt with the left hand, hold it and pull so that he will be forced to leave it, seeing the point in front of him, and so will anyone else when we do the same to them as shown above at the portraiture marked number 93 behind the collar.
  
 
''This is the end of the second grab shown and executed by the Lieutenant at the Prevost.''
 
''This is the end of the second grab shown and executed by the Lieutenant at the Prevost.''
Line 2,097: Line 2,113:
 
''The following is the defense of the said first strike to make and to execute the third grab for the Prevost against the Lieutenant.''
 
''The following is the defense of the said first strike to make and to execute the third grab for the Prevost against the Lieutenant.''
  
And to do this, the said Prevost has also made one of the said drawings, guards, and placements, with the aforementioned step, and remaining on the left foot, and the said Prevost seeing that the said Lieutenant at the same time has thrown a high right-hand, the said Prevost being on the left foot pulls it back, and crosses the sword that the said Lieutenant has thrown a high right-hand or a high thrust, and defending himself the said Prevost this way, beating it down strong on weak, keeping the back of the sword hand down, placing the point straight at the face of the said Lieutenant, also keeping the left hand right and above the right thigh as shown above at the said portraiture marked number 100.
+
And to do this, the said Prevost has also made one of the said drawings, guards, and placements, with the aforementioned step, and remaining on the left foot, and the said Prevost seeing that the said Lieutenant at the same time has thrown a high right-hand, the said Prevost being on the left foot pulls it back, and crosses the sword that the said Lieutenant has thrown a high right-hand or high thrust, and defending himself the said Prevost this way, beating it down strong on weak, keeping the back of the sword hand down, placing the point straight at the face of the said Lieutenant, also keeping the left hand right and above the right thigh as shown above at the said portraiture marked number 100.
  
 
''The end of the defense and protection of the said strike, for preparing to make the said third grab for the defending Prevost.''
 
''The end of the defense and protection of the said strike, for preparing to make the said third grab for the defending Prevost.''
Line 2,177: Line 2,193:
 
''The end of the guard to make a strike, to execute the fourth grab for the Lieutenant.''
 
''The end of the guard to make a strike, to execute the fourth grab for the Lieutenant.''
  
''Next he will be showing the guard and position to defend a high right-hand or a high thrust thrown by the said Lieutenant against the Prevost to make the fourth grab.''
+
''Next he will be showing the guard and position to defend a high right-hand or high thrust thrown by the said Lieutenant against the Prevost to make the fourth grab.''
  
 
To do this, the said Prevost must also have made one of the said three drawings and be on the left foot while keeping himself in middle guard, which is best, keeping the back of the sword hand up, placing the point straight at the left nipple of the said Lieutenant, and the left hand right upon the lap, as shown above at the portraiture marked number 106.
 
To do this, the said Prevost must also have made one of the said three drawings and be on the left foot while keeping himself in middle guard, which is best, keeping the back of the sword hand up, placing the point straight at the left nipple of the said Lieutenant, and the left hand right upon the lap, as shown above at the portraiture marked number 106.
Line 2,199: Line 2,215:
 
| ''The high right-hand or high thrust thrown by the Lieutenant and defended by the Prevost that will have to be repeated at the Lieutenant to execute the fourth grab against the Prevost.''
 
| ''The high right-hand or high thrust thrown by the Lieutenant and defended by the Prevost that will have to be repeated at the Lieutenant to execute the fourth grab against the Prevost.''
  
And to do this, this said Lieutenant must be on the left foot in high guard as shown above at the other portraiture marked number 105, seen in his place. And to execute this strike which at the said Lieutenant's choice is either a high right-hand or a high thrust, he will advance the right foot and throw a steep thrust at the face of the Prevost, keeping the sword hilt even higher than the right shoulder and the back of the sword hand down, and the left hand in front of his chin as shown above at the portraiture marked number 107.
+
And to do this, this said Lieutenant must be on the left foot in high guard as shown above at the other portraiture marked number 105, seen in his place. And to execute this strike which at the said Lieutenant's choice is either a high right-hand or high thrust, he will advance the right foot and throw a steep thrust at the face of the Prevost, keeping the sword hilt even higher than the right shoulder and the back of the sword hand down, and the left hand in front of his chin as shown above at the portraiture marked number 107.
  
 
''The end of the strike for the attacking Lieutenant.''
 
''The end of the strike for the attacking Lieutenant.''
Line 2,205: Line 2,221:
 
''The way to defend the Prevost at the aforementioned high right-hand or high thrust thrown by the Lieutenant so that afterwards he then execute the said fourth grab.''
 
''The way to defend the Prevost at the aforementioned high right-hand or high thrust thrown by the Lieutenant so that afterwards he then execute the said fourth grab.''
  
And to do this, this said Prevost must be on the left foot in middle guard as shown above at the portraiture marked number 106. And for the defense of this high right-hand or high thrust thrown by the said Lieutenant, this said Prevost needs to pull the left foot back and cross his sword with that of the said Lieutenant, be it a high right-hand or a high thrust, strong on weak, just like we did above at any one of the other said counters and continuations; and present a thrust to the face of the said Lieutenant, keeping the back of the sword hand down and the nails up, and the left hand right of his nipple, placing the sword point straight at the mouth of the said Lieutenant as shown and done above at the portraiture of the said Prevost marked number 108 behind the collar.
+
And to do this, this said Prevost must be on the left foot in middle guard as shown above at the portraiture marked number 106. And for the defense of this high right-hand or high thrust thrown by the said Lieutenant, this said Prevost needs to pull the left foot back and cross his sword with that of the said Lieutenant, be it a high right-hand or high thrust, strong on weak, just like we did above at any one of the other said counters and continuations; and present a thrust to the face of the said Lieutenant, keeping the back of the sword hand down and the nails up, and the left hand right of his nipple, placing the sword point straight at the mouth of the said Lieutenant as shown and done above at the portraiture of the said Prevost marked number 108 behind the collar.
  
 
''This is how the said Prevost effectively guards the aforementioned strike thrown by the said Lieutenant.''
 
''This is how the said Prevost effectively guards the aforementioned strike thrown by the said Lieutenant.''
  
Next we will show the said fourth and last grab which is very subtle to make his adversaries let go of his weapons, which will be in the middle of a high right-hand or a high thrust that will be thrown and will be served to tell us whether they are ignorant or knowledgeable. Because if he is ignorant and clumsy, it will easily be done at him, and if he is skillful, he must feint as will be seen later in time at the declaration of the Lieutenant, who will do this to show the Prevost.
+
Next we will show the said fourth and last grab which is very subtle to make his adversaries let go of his weapons, which will be in the middle of a high right-hand or high thrust that will be thrown and will be served to tell us whether they are ignorant or knowledgeable. Because if he is ignorant and clumsy, it will easily be done at him, and if he is skillful, he must feint as will be seen later in time at the declaration of the Lieutenant, who will do this to show the Prevost.
  
 
| ''Maindroit ou estoc d’haut, tiré par le Lieutenent, & deffendu par le Prevost, que faudra reiterer au Lieutenent, pour executer la quatriesme prinse contre le Prevost.''
 
| ''Maindroit ou estoc d’haut, tiré par le Lieutenent, & deffendu par le Prevost, que faudra reiterer au Lieutenent, pour executer la quatriesme prinse contre le Prevost.''
Line 2,229: Line 2,245:
 
| ''The fourth grab shown by the attacking Lieutenant to the defending Prevost, as clearly shown and written below.''
 
| ''The fourth grab shown by the attacking Lieutenant to the defending Prevost, as clearly shown and written below.''
  
And to do this, the Lieutenant being on the left foot as shown above at the portraiture of the aforementioned position and the guard marked number 105, advanced the right foot and throws a high right-hand or a high thrust on the left of the Prevost to test, as stated and shown above at the portraiture of the Lieutenant marked number 107, and the Lieutenant seeing that the Prevost has defended the high right-hand or high thrust, this said Lieutenant in order to make the grab steals away his sword with a right-hand below the sword of the Prevost, and let his sword drop above the arms of the Prevost, turning the nails of the sword hand up, and with the left hand near the tip take the sword of the Prevost. With this the Lieutenant tells the Prevost, "Listen, if I wanted to lower and press my left hand down you would be forced to let go of your sword, as you can do to me and in fact will do, as will be seen after provided that you do as shown above at this said portraiture and figure of the said Lieutenant marked number 109.
+
And to do this, the Lieutenant being on the left foot as shown above at the portraiture of the aforementioned position and the guard marked number 105, advanced the right foot and throws a high right-hand or high thrust on the left of the Prevost to test, as stated and shown above at the portraiture of the Lieutenant marked number 107, and the Lieutenant seeing that the Prevost has defended the high right-hand or high thrust, this said Lieutenant in order to make the grab steals away his sword with a right-hand below the sword of the Prevost, and let his sword drop above the arms of the Prevost, turning the nails of the sword hand up, and with the left hand near the tip take the sword of the Prevost. With this the Lieutenant tells the Prevost, "Listen, if I wanted to lower and press my left hand down you would be forced to let go of your sword, as you can do to me and in fact will do, as will be seen after provided that you do as shown above at this said portraiture and figure of the said Lieutenant marked number 109.
  
 
''This is the end of the said fourth and last grab for the said demonstrating Lieutenant against the defending Prevost.''
 
''This is the end of the said fourth and last grab for the said demonstrating Lieutenant against the defending Prevost.''
Line 2,255: Line 2,271:
 
| ''The fourth and last grab executed by the defending Prevost against his demonstrator the Lieutenant, as it appears at the portraitures showing him what to do above.''
 
| ''The fourth and last grab executed by the defending Prevost against his demonstrator the Lieutenant, as it appears at the portraitures showing him what to do above.''
  
And to do this, the Lieutenant must be on the left foot as stated above, and while advancing the right foot he will throw a high right-hand or a high thrust of his choice as shown above at the other portraitures of the Lieutenant marked number 107 and the Lieutenant next having thrown one of the said strikes, the Prevost does the same as above. The said Lieutenant having done as appears at the portraiture marked number 109 but with this grab the said Lieutenant is forced to let go of his sword and must use his left hand to beat down the sword of the Prevost, who would throw a thrust as appears at the portraiture above marked number 111 behind the collar.
+
And to do this, the Lieutenant must be on the left foot as stated above, and while advancing the right foot he will throw a high right-hand or high thrust of his choice as shown above at the other portraitures of the Lieutenant marked number 107 and the Lieutenant next having thrown one of the said strikes, the Prevost does the same as above. The said Lieutenant having done as appears at the portraiture marked number 109 but with this grab the said Lieutenant is forced to let go of his sword and must use his left hand to beat down the sword of the Prevost, who would throw a thrust as appears at the portraiture above marked number 111 behind the collar.
  
 
''The end of what the said Lieutenant does to having shown the Prevost how he must make this grab.''
 
''The end of what the said Lieutenant does to having shown the Prevost how he must make this grab.''
Line 2,261: Line 2,277:
 
''The following is the execution of the said fourth and last grab of the said sword alone for the Prevost against the said Lieutenant his said demonstrator.''
 
''The following is the execution of the said fourth and last grab of the said sword alone for the Prevost against the said Lieutenant his said demonstrator.''
  
And to do this, this said Prevost must be on the left foot and when he sees that the Lieutenant or another attacker will throw a high right-hand or a high thrust, having advanced the right foot, the said Prevost will pull his left foot back, and at the same time steal away his sword below the sword hilt of the said Lieutenant, and without a moment to waste, let the sword point fall on the said Lieutenant, and the said Prevost will forcefully take the sword point of the said Lieutenant with the left hand and pass and lower it, so it will force the said Lieutenant to let go of his sword as shown above at the portraiture of the said Prevost marked number 112.
+
And to do this, this said Prevost must be on the left foot and when he sees that the Lieutenant or another attacker will throw a high right-hand or high thrust, having advanced the right foot, the said Prevost will pull his left foot back, and at the same time steal away his sword below the sword hilt of the said Lieutenant, and without a moment to waste, let the sword point fall on the said Lieutenant, and the said Prevost will forcefully take the sword point of the said Lieutenant with the left hand and pass and lower it, so it will force the said Lieutenant to let go of his sword as shown above at the portraiture of the said Prevost marked number 112.
  
 
''This is the end of the said fourth and last grab of the said sword alone, both by the said attacking Lieutenant as well as for the defending Prevost.''
 
''This is the end of the said fourth and last grab of the said sword alone, both by the said attacking Lieutenant as well as for the defending Prevost.''
Line 2,388: Line 2,404:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 121-122.png|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 121-122.png|400x400px|center]]
| ''The low guard and position to execute the second strike of the said subtlety, which is a low backhand, being on the right foot, will serve to gather information to report whether ignorant or knowledgeable, both for the attacking Lieutenant as well as for the defending Prevost.''
+
| ''The low guard and position to execute the second strike of the said subtlety, which is a low reversal, being on the right foot, will serve to gather information to report whether ignorant or knowledgeable, both for the attacking Lieutenant as well as for the defending Prevost.''
  
 
To skillfully and effectively execute the said second subtlety for the said Lieutenant, he must have made one of the said drawings and to throw the second strike the said Lieutenant must be on the right foot in low guard, the cutting edge of the sword down, the sword hilt upon the right lap, placing the sword point straight at the right thigh of the Prevost, keeping the left hand right of his braies as shown above at the portraiture marked number 121.
 
To skillfully and effectively execute the said second subtlety for the said Lieutenant, he must have made one of the said drawings and to throw the second strike the said Lieutenant must be on the right foot in low guard, the cutting edge of the sword down, the sword hilt upon the right lap, placing the sword point straight at the right thigh of the Prevost, keeping the left hand right of his braies as shown above at the portraiture marked number 121.
Line 2,414: Line 2,430:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 123-124.png|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 123-124.png|400x400px|center]]
| ''The second strike which is a low backhand will serve to gather information to better execute the second subtlety for the Lieutenant against the Prevost.''
+
| ''The second strike which is a low reversal will serve to gather information to better execute the second subtlety for the Lieutenant against the Prevost.''
  
 
And to do this, the Lieutenant must be on the right foot in low guard as shown above at the other portraitures marked at the said Lieutenant in number 121. And being on this step and guard, he pretends to throw a thrust at the face of the Prevost and at the same instant advances the left foot and throws a back-hand at the right knee of the Prevost, keeping the sword hilt a bit high and keeping the left hand below the sword arm as shown above at the portraiture marked number 123 behind his bonnet.
 
And to do this, the Lieutenant must be on the right foot in low guard as shown above at the other portraitures marked at the said Lieutenant in number 121. And being on this step and guard, he pretends to throw a thrust at the face of the Prevost and at the same instant advances the left foot and throws a back-hand at the right knee of the Prevost, keeping the sword hilt a bit high and keeping the left hand below the sword arm as shown above at the portraiture marked number 123 behind his bonnet.
  
''The end of the strike which is a low backhand, which will serve to gather information for the said Lieutenant to report back ignorance and not knowledge, as he has done.''
+
''The end of the strike which is a low reversal, which will serve to gather information for the said Lieutenant to report back ignorance and not knowledge, as he has done.''
  
''The following is what the said Prevost does for the defense of the said low backhand throw by the said Lieutenant.''
+
''The following is what the said Prevost does to defend against the said low reversal throw by the said Lieutenant.''
  
And to do this, the Prevost being also on the right foot in low guard as shown at the said portraiture marked number 122, and at this strike of the said Lieutenant having advanced the left foot to throw a low back-hand at the knee of the Prevost, which seeing the charge it, the said Prevost pull the right foot back and crosses his sword with that of the said Lieutenant, which is ignorant, as done daily by all of the ignorant demonstrators; but the skilled and the learned no longer does this, because he must gain time in everything, and especially in the art of fencing, as will be seen later and; and the said Prevost keeps his left hand right of his chest as shown at the said portraiture marked number 124.
+
And to do this, the Prevost being also on the right foot in low guard as shown at the said portraiture marked number 122, and at this strike of the said Lieutenant having advanced the left foot to throw a low back-hand at the knee of the Prevost, which seeing him charge it, the said Prevost pulls the right foot back and crosses his sword with that of the said Lieutenant, which is ignorant, as done daily by all of the ignorant demonstrators; but the skilled and the learned no longer does this, because he must gain time in everything, and especially in the art of fencing, as will be seen later; and the said Prevost keeps his left hand right of his chest as shown at the said portraiture marked number 124.
  
''The end of the false strike that this said Prevost has done because he left the clean and took the unsuitable strike.''
+
''The end of the false strike that this said Prevost has done because he has took the unsuitable and improper strike.''
  
 
| ''Le second coup, qui est un renvers de bas, qui servira d’espion pour mieux faire & executer la seconde subtilité, pour le Lieutenent, contre le Prevost.''
 
| ''Le second coup, qui est un renvers de bas, qui servira d’espion pour mieux faire & executer la seconde subtilité, pour le Lieutenent, contre le Prevost.''
Line 2,440: Line 2,456:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 125-126.png|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[File:Sainct Didier 125-126.png|400x400px|center]]
| ''The second strike which is a backhand at the arms of the Prevost thrown and executed by this Lieutenant against the Prevost, showing that he could do so, and without beating down on the sword, as he has does at the coming portraitures.''
+
| ''The second strike which is a reversal at the arms of the Prevost thrown and executed by this Lieutenant against the Prevost, showing that he could do so, and without beating down on the sword, as he has does at the coming portraitures.''
  
 
And to do this, the said Lieutenant being on the right foot in low guard as stated and shown above marked number 121. And the said Lieutenant being on the right foot having pretended to throw a thrust at the face of the said Prevost, advances the left foot to pretend to throw a back-hand at the knee, the Prevost would want to beat down sword against sword as he normally does. The Lieutenant seeing this, winds back his sword and throws a back-hand at the elbow of the sword arm, keeping the left hand below the sword arm, as shown above at the portraiture marked 125 behind his bonnet.
 
And to do this, the said Lieutenant being on the right foot in low guard as stated and shown above marked number 121. And the said Lieutenant being on the right foot having pretended to throw a thrust at the face of the said Prevost, advances the left foot to pretend to throw a back-hand at the knee, the Prevost would want to beat down sword against sword as he normally does. The Lieutenant seeing this, winds back his sword and throws a back-hand at the elbow of the sword arm, keeping the left hand below the sword arm, as shown above at the portraiture marked 125 behind his bonnet.
  
''The end of the backhand executed and shown by the said Lieutenant to the Prevost.''
+
''The end of the reversal executed and shown by the said Lieutenant to the Prevost.''
  
 
''The following is what the said Prevost does.''
 
''The following is what the said Prevost does.''
  
The said Prevost being on the right foot in low guard as shown at the said portraiture marked 122, the said Prevost pulls his right foot back, throws a backhand at the arms of the said Lieutenant, and should not have crossed his sword with that of the said Lieutenant, as he had done returning to beat down the aforementioned strike which is how the said Lieutenant throws a backhand at his sword elbow, and keeping the said Prevost's left hand right of his left nipple, as shown above at the said portraiture marked number 126 behind his collar.
+
The said Prevost being on the right foot in low guard as shown at the said portraiture marked 122, the said Prevost pulls his right foot back, throws a reversal at the arms of the said Lieutenant, and should not have crossed his sword with that of the said Lieutenant, as he had done returning to beat down the aforementioned strike which is how the said Lieutenant throws a reversal at his sword elbow, and keeping the said Prevost's left hand right of his left nipple, as shown above at the said portraiture marked number 126 behind his collar.
  
''The following is another very effective and subtle strike, leaving the backhand at the said arms, and coming with a thrust to the chest, crossing the sword of the said Prevost with the strong on weak, as shown here by the author at the Prevost and consquently the Prevost will have learned from the said Lieutenant.''
+
''The following is another very effective and subtle strike, leaving the reversal at the said arms, and coming with a thrust to the chest, crossing the sword of the said Prevost with the strong on weak, as shown here by the author at the Prevost and consequently the Prevost will have learned from the said Lieutenant.''
  
 
| ''Second coup qui est un renvers sur le bras du Prevost tiré & executé par ce prochain Lieutenent contre le Prevost, monstrant que luy en pouvoit faire autant, & non rabattre de l’espée, comme il a fait cy dessus aux prochaines pourtaitures.''
 
| ''Second coup qui est un renvers sur le bras du Prevost tiré & executé par ce prochain Lieutenent contre le Prevost, monstrant que luy en pouvoit faire autant, & non rabattre de l’espée, comme il a fait cy dessus aux prochaines pourtaitures.''
Line 2,476: Line 2,492:
 
''The following is what the Prevost must do for the last strike of the sword alone.''
 
''The following is what the Prevost must do for the last strike of the sword alone.''
  
And this last said Prevost of the entire treatise, being on the right foot, having seen that the Lieutenant wants to throw a low back-hand at the knee, the said Prevost pulled back his right foot and thought to throw a back-hand at the sword arm of the said Lieutenant, as was shown by the above portraiture of the said Prevost marked number 125, yet here the Prevost has found himself frustrated by the said execution of the said backhand which he thought he was he doing well until the said Lieutenant beat him down, strong on weak, and presented a thrust at him, but this was done by the said Lieutenant to show the Prevost that he can make two of the aforementioned strikes - the backhand and thrust - and so the last said Prevost, is to keep his left hand right of his nipple to beat down the sword of the said Lieutenant since he was crossed strong on weak and cannot defend against a thrust other than with his left hand, as shown above at the portraiture marked number 128 near the plume of his bonnet.
+
And this last said Prevost of the entire treatise, being on the right foot, having seen that the Lieutenant wants to throw a low back-hand at the knee, the said Prevost pulled back his right foot and thought to throw a back-hand at the sword arm of the said Lieutenant, as was shown by the above portraiture of the said Prevost marked number 125, yet here the Prevost has found himself frustrated by the said execution of the said reversal which he thought he was he doing well until the said Lieutenant beat him down, strong on weak, and presented a thrust at him, but this was done by the said Lieutenant to show the Prevost that he can make two of the aforementioned strikes - the reversal and thrust - and so the last said Prevost, is to keep his left hand right of his nipple to beat down the sword of the said Lieutenant since he was crossed strong on weak and cannot defend against a thrust other than with his left hand, as shown above at the portraiture marked number 128 near the plume of his bonnet.
  
 
''This is the end and the defense of the said strike for the last Prevost against the said Lieutenant, and every other content of in the treatise of the sword alone as stated, mother of all fencing.''
 
''This is the end and the defense of the said strike for the last Prevost against the said Lieutenant, and every other content of in the treatise of the sword alone as stated, mother of all fencing.''
Line 2,507: Line 2,523:
  
 
# Right-hand
 
# Right-hand
# Backhand
+
# Reversal
 
# Thrust
 
# Thrust
  
Line 2,513: Line 2,529:
  
 
# Right-hand
 
# Right-hand
# Backhand
+
# Reversal
  
 
The reason why I remove the said thrust is since the racket has no point, and thus one would not be able to make a thrust.
 
The reason why I remove the said thrust is since the racket has no point, and thus one would not be able to make a thrust.
  
It is true that sometimes we strike and beat down with the racket when the ball comes straight to the face or higher, which is that we return the ball, and we beat it down with the racket when it comes from high or to the face keeping it straight, and leaning neither on the right nor left, and yet in the said game of tennis, there are only the aforementioned two strikes, right-hand and backhand. But it is necessary to multiply them properly to 4 targets, from high and low, for example right-hand from below, and right-hand from above, backhand from below, and backhand from above, and thus it is necessary to be very dextrous and graceful to know how to strike because we strike at each other as we do with the said fencing. And knowing how to strike skillfully, we must observe the words of our ancestors who are skilled tennis players, who said whoever leaps to forsake the volley, will never be an esteemed player; it is necessary to take heed here, which is that when you can volley, you should never wait for a leap. The reason is that with a leap, several accidents can occur, yet on the volley, never, if one is well trained, and is safe.
+
It is true that sometimes we strike and beat down with the racket when the ball comes straight to the face or higher, which is that we return the ball, and we beat it down with the racket when it comes from high or to the face keeping it straight, and leaning neither on the right nor left, and yet in the said game of tennis, there are only the aforementioned two strikes, right-hand and reversal. But it is necessary to multiply them properly to 4 targets, from high and low, for example right-hand from below, and right-hand from above, reversal from below, and reversal from above, and thus it is necessary to be very dexterous and graceful to know how to strike because we strike at each other as we do with the said fencing. And knowing how to strike skillfully, we must observe the words of our ancestors who are skilled tennis players, who said whoever leaps to forsake the volley, will never be an esteemed player; it is necessary to take heed here, which is that when you can volley, you should never wait for a leap. The reason is that with a leap, several accidents can occur, yet on the volley, never, if one is well trained, and is safe.
  
 
The accident that can happen to the said volley is to crack the wood of the racket, but this is not an accident, instead it is a fault committed by the one who made the wood and not from the inside of the racket to the ball. For this reason I want to warn those who are not yet sure of the leap, who practice the said volley, because it should never be done, but they are the ones who fail it, and if it is necessary, we still have recourse to the said leap, and yet who can, must always take said volley, and not said leap.
 
The accident that can happen to the said volley is to crack the wood of the racket, but this is not an accident, instead it is a fault committed by the one who made the wood and not from the inside of the racket to the ball. For this reason I want to warn those who are not yet sure of the leap, who practice the said volley, because it should never be done, but they are the ones who fail it, and if it is necessary, we still have recourse to the said leap, and yet who can, must always take said volley, and not said leap.
Line 2,533: Line 2,549:
 
''I do not put these said reasons for those who already understand them, but on the contrary for those who do not understand them.''
 
''I do not put these said reasons for those who already understand them, but on the contrary for those who do not understand them.''
  
I was kind enough to speak of tennis because a brave man who is one of the good players came to see me two or three times only, and having learned effectively two or three strikes, he increased his skill almost by fifteen; and the said brave man throws a fronthand and backhand very gracefully, and thus tennis and the said fencing, as stated have a great affinity.
+
I was kind enough to speak of tennis because a brave man who is one of the good players came to see me two or three times only, and having learned effectively two or three strikes, he increased his skill almost by fifteen; and the said brave man throws a forehand and reversal very gracefully, and thus tennis and the said fencing, as stated have a great affinity.
  
 
END.
 
END.
Line 2,602: Line 2,618:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
|  
+
| PRIVILEGE OF THE KING.
 +
King Charles of France by the grace of God. To our friends and foes, the people on the courts of Parliament, Bailiffs, Officials, Provosts, or their Lieutenants, and to all our justices and officers, and to anyone who wishes to be included, salutations and blessings. Our dear and good friend Provencal Gentleman Esquire Henry S. Didier, we have heard that he wrote certain books that he had dedicated to us in the manner of fencing, namely on the sword alone, the sword and dagger, sword and cape, sword and rondel, sword and targe, sword and buckler, two-handed sword, dual-wielding swords, and dagger alone, written for the art, order, and practice with the means to defend and offend at the same time with strikes that can be thrown both in attacking as well as in defending, which is very useful and notable for making skillful youths which similarly he will write for all of the weapons he would like to glady have printed and illuminated. However as something that he could only do with great expense and fees, he fears that after having incurred the said expenses, no printer nor booksellers nor anyone else, to his serious detriment and damage, would reprint them if he did not have our permission and special privilege. To that end, we have humbly implored and requested him to provide this letter as necessary. We desire with these causes as much as possible for us to treat every people with knowledge to the maintenance and advancement of things that are useful and beneficial to the public. So to encourage everyone to more willingly strive to do the same, having audited S. Didier, we have granted by those present that he can be free to have the all of the said books written by him on the same subjects mentioned above printed by any printer as he sees fit. And to that end, whoever the said printers chosen will be in charge of the books, will be compensated for the fees as is acceptable for doing this effect. We have continued to inhibit and defend all other booksellers and printers in our Kingdom, land, and lordship of our obedience, that during the terms of ten consecutive years following to be counted from the day and date to its said books will have been printed, they cannot print neither large, small, nor any other form whatever form it takes, and do not sell the above said books, which will have been printed by no other than by him or those who will be in charge of said S. Didier, on pain of arbitrary fine, confiscation, and loss of all said books. If we mandate you, we commit and enjoin by those presents and to each of you in right be, if as it will belong to him, that according to our granted permissions and will, you make or have made express inhibitions and defenses by us on the penalties mentioned above, and other than that will be imposed on all printers and  booksellers remaining in your rights and jurisdictions that by afterwards, none of them other than the one who will have charge and express commission of said by S. Didier, do not print nor put for sale during the said time of ten years the said books above mention and if after the said orders made you find any offenders proceed against them by condemnation of said penalties and otherwise also that will be done according to the requirements of the cases, because such is our pleasure, and because of the contents in those aforementioned present will be able to deal in several and various places. We want the vidimus<ref>A vidimus is a certified copy of an earlier act</ref> of these to be made under royal seal or collated by one of our notaries and secretaries done either as this present original and that by putting a brief or extracting the content in its said present at the beginning of the aforementioned books they are held as it should be, signaling to all the aforementioned booksellers and printers and others like them. Given in Paris on the twenty third day of January in the year of the Lord one thousand five hundred and seventy-three of the thirteenth reign<ref>of King Charles IX</ref>. Thus signed for the King by Brulart<ref>It must be either  Pierre or Jean Brûlart who both served on Parliament</ref> and sealed on a simple yellow wax queue<ref>If the seal is appended to the document with a strip of parchment, it is called a "queue". If there is a double strip, it is then called a "double queue".</ref>
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|  PRIVILEGE DU ROY.
 
|  PRIVILEGE DU ROY.
  
Charles par la grace de Dieu Roy de France. À noz amez & feaux, les gens tenans noz courts de Parlements, Baillifs, Senechaux, Prevosts, ou leurs Lieutenents, & à tous noz justiciers & officiers, & à chacun d’eux, si comme à luy appartiendra, Salut & dilection<ref>Dilection : attachement, amour pur.</ref>. Nostre cher & bien amé Henry de S. Didier Escuyer, gentilhomme Provençal, nous a fait entendre qu’il compose certains livres qu’il nous a dediez, sur la maniere de tirer des armes, à scavoir de l’espée seule, espée & dague, espée cape, espée rondelle, espée targue, espée bouclier, espée à deux mains, les deux espées, & la dague seule, redigez par art, ordre & pratique, avec moyen de soy deffendre & offencer en un mesme temps, des coups qu’on peut tirer, tant en assaillant, qu’en deffendant, fort utilles & notables pour adextrer la jeunesse, lesquels & semblablement tous ceux qu’il composera pour le fait des armes, il desireroit volontiers faire imprimer & mettre en lumiere. Toutefois estant chose qu’il n’a peu faire qu’avec grands fraits & despens, il craint qu’aprés y avoir esposé lesdits fraits, aucuns imprimeurs, ou libraires, & autres ne les feist à son grand detriment, & dommage, rimprimer, s’il n’avoit de nous permission, & privilege special. À ceste fin nous ayant humblement fait supplier, & requerir luy vouloir sur ce pourvoir de noz lettres à ce necessaires. Nous à ces causes desirans, en tant qu’il nous sera possible, favorablement traiter toutes personnes de bon scavoir, à l’entretenement & advencement des choses utiles, & profitables au public. Afin que chacun plus volontiers s’esvertue de faire le semblable, avons audit de S. Didier permis & octroyé, permettons & octroyons par ces presentes, qu’il puisse & luy soit loisible faire imprimer par tel imprimeur que bon luy semblera, lesdits livres cy dessus mentionnez, ensemble tous ceux qui seront par luy composez, sur le mesme subjet. Et à fin que celuy ou ceux desdits imprimeurs, qui auront charge de luy, de ce faire, ayant moyen d’eux recompenser des fraits, qu’il conviendra faire pour cest effet. Avons inhibé & defendu, inhibons & deffendons à tous autre libraires & imprimeurs de cestuy nostre Royaume, pais terres & seigneurie de nostre obeissance, que durant le temps & terme de dix ans ensuivans, consecutifs, à conter du jour & date qu’à sesdits livres auront esté imprimez, il n’ayent à imprimer, ne faire imprimer, ne grande, petite, ou autre forme, quelle qu’elle soit, ne vendre les dessusdits livres, qui auront esté imprimez par autres que par celuy ou ceux qui auront charge dudit de S. Didier, sur peine d’amende arbitraire, & de confiscation, & perte de tous lesdits livres. Si voulons & vous mandons, commettons & enjoignons par
+
Charles par la grace de Dieu Roy de France. À noz amez & feaux, les gens tenans noz courts de Parlements, Baillifs, Senechaux, Prevosts, ou leurs Lieutenents, & à tous noz justiciers & officiers, & à chacun d’eux, si comme à luy appartiendra, Salut & dilection<ref>Dilection : attachement, amour pur.</ref>. Nostre cher & bien amé Henry de S. Didier Escuyer, gentilhomme Provençal, nous a fait entendre qu’il compose certains livres qu’il nous a dediez, sur la maniere de tirer des armes, à scavoir de l’espée seule, espée & dague, espée cape, espée rondelle, espée targue, espée bouclier, espée à deux mains, les deux espées, & la dague seule, redigez par art, ordre & pratique, avec moyen de soy deffendre & offencer en un mesme temps, des coups qu’on peut tirer, tant en assaillant, qu’en deffendant, fort utilles & notables pour adextrer la jeunesse, lesquels & semblablement tous ceux qu’il composera pour le fait des armes, il desireroit volontiers faire imprimer & mettre en lumiere. Toutefois estant chose qu’il n’a peu faire qu’avec grands fraits & despens, il craint qu’aprés y avoir esposé lesdits fraits, aucuns imprimeurs, ou libraires, & autres ne les feist à son grand detriment, & dommage, rimprimer, s’il n’avoit de nous permission, & privilege special. À ceste fin nous ayant humblement fait supplier, & requerir luy vouloir sur ce pourvoir de noz lettres à ce necessaires. Nous à ces causes desirans, en tant qu’il nous sera possible, favorablement traiter toutes personnes de bon scavoir, à l’entretenement & advencement des choses utiles, & profitables au public. Afin que chacun plus volontiers s’esvertue de faire le semblable, avons audit de S. Didier permis & octroyé, permettons & octroyons par ces presentes, qu’il puisse & luy soit loisible faire imprimer par tel imprimeur que bon luy semblera, lesdits livres cy dessus mentionnez, ensemble tous ceux qui seront par luy composez, sur le mesme subjet. Et à fin que celuy ou ceux desdits imprimeurs, qui auront charge de luy, de ce faire, ayant moyen d’eux recompenser des fraits, qu’il conviendra faire pour cest effet. Avons inhibé & defendu, inhibons & deffendons à tous autre libraires & imprimeurs de cestuy nostre Royaume, pais terres & seigneurie de nostre obeissance, que durant le temps & terme de dix ans ensuivans, consecutifs, à conter du jour & date qu’à sesdits livres auront esté imprimez, il n’ayent à imprimer, ne faire imprimer, ne grande, petite, ou autre forme, quelle qu’elle soit, ne vendre les dessusdits livres, qui auront esté imprimez par autres que par celuy ou ceux qui auront charge dudit de S. Didier, sur peine d’amende arbitraire, & de confiscation, & perte de tous lesdits livres. Si voulons & vous mandons, commettons & enjoignons par ces presentes, & à chacun de vous en droit soy, si comme à luy appartiendra, que selon & ensuivant noz permissions octroy & vouloir, vous faites ou faites faire expresses inhibitions & deffenses de par nous sur les peines cy dessus indites, & autre que verrez estre à imposer à tous imprimeurs & libraires demourans en voz destroits, & juridictions, que par cy aprés eulx, n’aucuns d’eux, autre que celuy qui aura charge & commission expresse dudit de S. Didier, pour ce faire n’ayent à imprimer ne faire imprimer, mettre n’exposer en vente, durant ledit temps de dix ans lesdits livres cy dessus mentionez & si aprés lesdits commandemens faits vous trouvez aucuns contrevenans à iceux procedez à l’encontre d’eux par condemnation desdites peines & autrement aussi que verrez estre à faire selon l’exigence des cas, car tel est nostre plaisir, & parce que du contenu en cesdites presentes l’on pourra avoir affaire en plusieurs & divers lieux. Nous voulons qu’au vidimus<ref>Un vidimus est la copie certifiée d'un acte antérieur.</ref> d’icelles fait soubs scel royal ou collationné par l’un de noz notaires & secretaires fait soit adjousté comme à ce present original & que en mettant par brief ou extrait le contenu en sesdites presentes au commencement desdits livres elles soient tenues pour deuement signifiees à tous libraires & imprimeurs dessusdits & autres qu’il appartiendra. Donné à Paris le vingtroisiesme jour de Janvier l’an de grace mil cinq cens soixante & treize de nostre regne le treziesme. Ainsi signé par le Roy Brullart<ref>Il doit s'agit de Pierre ou Jean Brûlart (tout deux avait une charge au Parlement) qui signe pour le roi.</ref> & seellées sur simple queue de cire jaulne.
ces presentes, & à chacun de vous en droit soy, si comme à luy appartiendra, que selon & ensuivant noz permissions octroy & vouloir, vous faites ou faites faire expresses inhibitions & deffenses de par nous sur les peines cy dessus indites, & autre que verrez estre à imposer à tous imprimeurs & libraires demourans en voz destroits, & juridictions, que par cy aprés eulx, n’aucuns d’eux, autre que celuy qui aura charge &
 
commission expresse dudit de S. Didier, pour ce faire n’ayent à imprimer ne faire imprimer, mettre n’exposer en vente, durant ledit temps de dix ans lesdits livres cy dessus mentionez & si aprés lesdits commandemens faits vous trouvez aucuns contrevenans à iceux procedez à l’encontre d’eux par condemnation desdites peines & autrement aussi que verrez estre à faire selon l’exigence des cas, car tel est nostre plaisir, & parce que du
 
contenu en cesdites presentes l’on pourra avoir affaire en plusieurs & divers lieux. Nous voulons qu’au vidimus<ref>Un vidimus est la copie certifiée d'un acte antérieur.</ref> d’icelles fait soubs scel royal ou collationné par l’un de noz notaires & secretaires fait soit adjousté comme à ce present original & que en mettant par brief ou extrait le contenu en sesdites presentes au commencement desdits livres elles soient tenues pour deuement signifiees à tous libraires & imprimeurs dessusdits & autres qu’il appartiendra. Donné à Paris le vingtroisiesme jour de Janvier l’an de grace mil cinq cens soixante & treize de nostre regne le treziesme. Ainsi signé par le Roy Brullart<ref>Il doit s'agit de Pierre ou Jean Brûlart (tout deux avait une charge au Parlement) qui signe pour le roi.</ref> & seellées sur simple queue de cire jaulne.
 
  
 
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Latest revision as of 18:04, 28 July 2021

Henry de Sainct Didier
Born 1530s (?)
Pertuis, Provence
Died after 1584
Paris, France (?)
Occupation Fencing master
Patron Charles IX of France
Influences
Influenced Salvator Fabris (?)
Genres Fencing manual
Language Middle French
Notable work(s) Les secrets du premier livre sur l'espée seule (1573)
Translations Traducción castellano
Signature Henry de Sainct Didier sig.png

Henry de Sainct Didier, Esq. was a 16th century French fencing master. He was born to a noble family in Pertuis in the Provence region of France, son of Luc de Sainct Didier. Sainct Didier made his career in the French army, ultimately serving 25 years and seeing action in Piedmont, Italy from 1554 - 1555. He wrote of himself that he "lived his whole life learning to fight with the single sword" and eventually "reached a point of perfection" in his art. Apparently he became a fencing master of some renown, for in ca. 1573 he secured a royal privilege for a period of ten years for treatises on a number of weapons, including the dagger, single side sword, double side swords, sword and buckler, sword and cloak, sword and dagger, sword and shield (both rotella and targe), and greatsword. Unfortunately, only his treatise on the single side sword, titled Les secrets du premier livre sur l'espée seule ("Secrets of the Premier Book on the Single Sword") and printed on 4 June 1573, is known to survive; it seems likely that the others were never published at all.

Treatise

Additional Resources

  • Hyatt, Robert Preston and Wilson, Devon. "The Single Sword of Henry de Sainct Didier." Masters of Medieval and Renaissance Martial Arts. Ed. Jeffrey Hull. Boulder, CO: Paladin Press, 2008. ISBN 978-1-58160-668-3
  • Sainct Didier, Henry de. The Single Sword of Henry de Sainct-Didier (Traicté Contenant Les Secrets Du Premier Livre Sur L'Espée Seule). Trans. Robert Preston Hyatt and Devon Wilson. Boulder, CO: Paladin Press, 2009. ISBN 978-1581607048
  • Slee, Chris. Secrets of the Sword Alone. LongEdge Press, 2014. ISBN 978-0646926353

References

  1. Pristin : ancien, antérieur
  2. Insertion du « a ».
  3. Dupuis describes this as a wooden board placed in the back wall of the tennis court which, if hit by a volley, is scored immediately. In modern tennis, this board is replaced by a grid.
  4. « L'es », habituellement orthographiée « ais », désigne une planche de bois placée dans le mur du fond de la salle de jeu de paume qui, si elle est touchée par un coup de volée, donne le point immédiatement. Dans le jeu de paume moderne, cette planche est remplacée par une grille. Il est possible que cet « ais » ait donné le terme anglais d'« ace » que les étymologies modernes confondent avec l'« as » du jeu de carte. Voir la définition d' « ais » de l'Encyclopédie de Diderot et d'Alembert.
  5. L’esteuf : ancien nom pour la balle.
  6. précéder. « Préaller » subsiste en français sous la forme « préalable ».
  7. Il s’agit très probablement du maître d’arme italien Fabris Salvator de Padoue (1544-1617). Voir la note sur Fabris Salvator de Vigeant p. 162 et aussi les références à ses publications (Vigeant p. 55-56)
  8. Version alimentaire de l’adage « blanc bonnet et bonnet blanc ».
  9. Transcription la plus sûre du texte : « gran d erre »
  10. Serviteur du grand prêtre venu arrêter Jésus au Mont des Olivier et dont l’oreille coupée a été immédiatement guérie. Selon la lecture du passage, il est parfois pris pour celui qui soufflète Jésus.
  11. Un des anciens nom de l’abeille.
  12. Sens incertain ; peut-être s'agit-il d'une mauvaise graphie de « filial ».
  13. drillant : étincellant, brillant (dictionnaire de Nicot).
  14. Correction du texte d’origine donnant « peid ».
  15. Cette correction sur les images d'Henri de Saint-Didier indique que celles-ci ont été réalisées avant la version finale du texte.
  16. Le « o » de troisiesme est curieusement placé en exposant.
  17. Suppression du doublement de l'esperluette.
  18. Dupuis states the original says left but is incompatible with the rest of the text and the engraving.
  19. Proposition de correction de l’édition originale qui donne « gauche », en incohérence avec la gravure et le texte plus bas qui confirme que la posture du Lieutenent est identique à celle de la section précédente où c’était bien le pied droit qui était reculé.
  20. Deuxième remarque de l'auteur sur les gravures montrant que le texte a été retouché après réception des gravures. À comparer avec une remarque similaire faite dans le i.33.
  21. Correction du texte d’origine donnant « Leiutenent ».
  22. In modern fencing, dérobement is a fencing term for disengage.
  23. Correction de l'édition originale qui omet lors d'un changement de page le début du mot « haute »
  24. The position of the hand illustrates the fingers down, in opposition to the text.
  25. La position de la main illustrée a les doigts au-dessus, en opposition avec le texte.
  26. Proposition de correction pour « bessoin »
  27. Proposition de correction pour « avan-main »
  28. Proposition de correction pour « couté »
  29. Proposition de correction pour « Vola ».
  30. Proposition de correction pour « ongle »
  31. Sens inconnu.
  32. The technique.
  33. La tuition est un synonyme de « garde », « défense », très souvent employé à cette époque pour appuyer le mot « défense ».
  34. Proposition de correction pour « Provost »
  35. Proposition de correction de « du–sixiesme »
  36. Proposition de correction pour « persent ».
  37. The triangle represented here is not correct. The one marked 65 seems to better reflect the proposed movement.
  38. Proposition de correction pour « le ongles ».
  39. Le triangle représenté ici n'est pas correct, celui cotté 65 paraît rendre mieux compte du déplacement proposé.
  40. Dupuis thinks 75 represents this correct and that 73 is incorrect.
  41. Proposition de correction pour « Lieutent ». La marque indiquant une contraction a probablement été omise.
  42. On pourrait compléter : « ...et le mettre en 4 ». L'illustration 73 est incorrecte puisque le pied gauche est resté sur la semelle 1 et n'est pas placé sur la semelle 3 (à gauche) comme demandé ; la position des pieds de l'illustration 75 correspond à ce qui aurait dû être représenté.
  43. The Prevost shown at the portraiture does not correspond to the text since he is on the right foot
  44. Proposition de correction pour « dh’aut »
  45. Sic.
  46. Le prévôt représenté ici ne correspond pas au texte puisqu'il se tient sur le pied droit.
  47. The Prevost of 80 isn't on the left foot as written but is coherent with 78.
  48. Le prévôt de la figure 80 n’est pas sur le pied gauche comme écrit et mais reste cohérent avec la figure 78.
  49. It is meant to read as Prevost here.
  50. Il faut évidemment lire ici « Prevost ».
  51. Proposition de correction pour « suprint »
  52. Sic.
  53. Suppression du doublement de l'esperluette dans « sa cuisse gauche, & & tous ».
  54. Sic. Au XVIe siècle, le genre des mots était encore indécis.
  55. The author is announcing here another edition to augment his book which has never has been written.
  56. L’auteur annonce ici une prochaine édition augmentée de son oeuvre qui n’a a priori jamais eu lieu.
  57. Proposition de correction pour « ou ».
  58. Proposition de correction pour « mostré »
  59. Du latin médiéval « inquinatum » signifiant « pour combien »
  60. lit. bark or shell, outer layer. Idiom similar to "Don't judge a book by its cover.
  61. A vidimus is a certified copy of an earlier act
  62. of King Charles IX
  63. It must be either Pierre or Jean Brûlart who both served on Parliament
  64. If the seal is appended to the document with a strip of parchment, it is called a "queue". If there is a double strip, it is then called a "double queue".
  65. Dilection : attachement, amour pur.
  66. Un vidimus est la copie certifiée d'un acte antérieur.
  67. Il doit s'agit de Pierre ou Jean Brûlart (tout deux avait une charge au Parlement) qui signe pour le roi.