Wiktenauer logo.png

Difference between revisions of "Francesco di Sandro Altoni"

From Wiktenauer
Jump to navigation Jump to search
 
Line 78: Line 78:
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| <p>[02 verso] in one’s belt or in one’s hands and to not know all of the modes that one could possibly use to offend and to defend, has, I think, the likeness with the ignorance, for example, of a horseman who thinks to know much on how to ride, yet leads with the thighs and the feet and relaxes the bridle to move a horse and to do business, and on the contrary kicks with his heels [spurs?] and spreads his feet when he wishes to stop the horse. However, the Captain has more to do with being the head of an army than its hand, that is to say counseling and commanding rather than fighting, nevertheless making use of the soldiers’ tools as a soldier of arms. I do not believe one can call a captain perfect who does not have his own knowledge of this art, besides it can be necessary for any great Prince to have to fight in the countryside or in the lists. Philip V, father of Perseus, the last King of the Macedonians, showed great personal valour, as a King, fighting in hand to hand combat over a bridge. In our times we have seen a dueling challenge between the Emperor and the King of France, which we might have seen if it had not been for the political ramifications. If a duel were to occur between them or persons of similar rank I say that he who trusts only in his strength, his heart, and in good fortune to forgive him[si rimette][?] does not have the advantage of one who understands this practice and shows that his mind was given to him in vain by nature. When both combatants would join, if there should not be much difference in courage, strength, or skill, who could say it would not be better to be experienced in arms and assured and assuaged by their knowing of the techniques, retreats, and parts [?] with which ones goes about safe and resolute while he who does not know them has to wait to resolve themselves immediately[?], uncertain of what is not thought of or unexpected.<p>
+
| <p>[02 verso] in one’s belt or in one’s hands and to not know all of the modes that one could possibly use to offend and to defend, has, I think, the likeness with the ignorance, for example, of a horseman who thinks to know much on how to ride, yet leads with the thighs and the feet and relaxes the bridle to move a horse and to do business, and on the contrary kicks with his heels and spreads his feet when he wishes to stop the horse. However, the Captain has more to do with being the head of an army than its hand, that is to say counseling and commanding rather than fighting, nevertheless making use of the soldiers’ tools as a soldier of arms. I do not believe one can call a captain perfect who does not have his own knowledge of this art, besides it can be necessary for any great Prince to have to fight in the countryside or in the lists. Philip V, father of Perseus, the last King of the Macedonians, showed great personal valour, as a King, fighting in hand to hand combat over a bridge. In our times we have seen a dueling challenge between the Emperor and the King of France, which we might have seen if it had not been for the political ramifications. If a duel were to occur between them or persons of similar rank I say that he who trusts only in his strength, his heart, and in good fortune to forgive him does not have the advantage of one who understands this practice and shows that his mind was given to him in vain by nature. When both combatants would join, if there should not be much difference in courage, strength, or skill, who could say it would not be better to be experienced in arms and assured and assuaged by their knowing of the techniques, retreats, and parts with which ones goes about safe and resolute while he who does not know them has to wait to resolve themselves immediately, uncertain of what is not thought of or unexpected.<p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  

Latest revision as of 16:22, 23 April 2021

Francesco di Sandro Altoni
Born late 1400s?
Died mid 1500s?
Occupation Fencing master
Citizenship Florentine
Patron Cosimo I de' Medici
Movement Florentine school
Influenced Marco Docciolini
Genres Fencing manual
Language Italian
Notable work(s) Monomachia ovvero Arte di Scherma
Manuscript(s)

Francesco di Sandro Altoni was a 16th century Italian fencing master. Little is known about this master's life; he seems to have been Florentine by birth and he is thought to have been fencing master to the court of Cosimo I de' Medici (1519-1574), Duke of Florence until 1569 and then Grand Duke of Tuscany. At some time during Cosimo's reign as Duke of Florence, Altoni wrote a treatise on fencing entitled Monomachia ovvero Arte di Scherma ("Dueling, or the Art of Defense") and dedicated it to Cosimo. The treatise survives in two manuscript copies, the MS II.iii.315 and MS L.V.23 The treatise begins with a letter and dedication to Cosimo, followed by a preface and introduction. The first weapon introduced is the sword alone, then two swords, sword and dagger, sword and dagger with an armored arm, sword and cape, bucker and targe, rotella, dagger, spadone, pike, partigianone, spiede, and partigiana in the 2nd book. The 3rd book contains the play of the half sword and presses (grappling) among other items.

Treatises

Additional Resources

References